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Tests

Laboratory investigations are very important issues today. A correct result can help a doctor to treat a patient properly, as well as the wrong result of a laboratory examination may misguide a physician toward mall treatment. Exactly here we take care of you. Finding out the accurate result of your given sample is our only motto.

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ABO Rh ( Blood )

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EDTASCS EDTA 60 Same Day

Blood typing is a test that determines a person’s blood type. The test is essential if you need a blood transfusion or are planning to donate blood. Not all blood types are compatible, so it’s important to know your blood group. Receiving blood that’s incompatible with your blood type could trigger a dangerous immune response. ABO Rh ( Blood ) is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

The blood types

Your blood type is determined by what kind of antigens your red blood cells have on the surface. Antigens are substances that help your body differentiate between its own cells and foreign, potentially dangerous ones. If your body thinks a cell is foreign, it will set out to destroy it. The ABO blood typing system groups your blood into one of four categories:
  • Type A has the A antigen.
  • Type B has the B antigen.
  • Type AB has both A and B antigens.
  • Type O has neither A nor B antigens.
If blood with antigens that you don’t have enters your system, your body will create antibodies against it. However, some people can still safely receive blood that isn’t their blood type. As long as the blood they receive doesn’t have any antigens that mark it as foreign, their bodies won’t attack it.

In other words, donations work as follows:

  • O: Type O individuals can donate blood to anyone, because their blood has no antigens. However, they can only receive blood from other type O individuals (because blood with any antigens is seen as foreign).
  • A: Type A individuals can donate to other type A individuals and type AB individuals. Type A individuals can receive blood only from other type A individuals and type O individuals.
  • B: Type B individuals can donate blood to other B individuals and AB individuals. Type B individuals can receive blood only from type B individuals and type O individuals.
  • AB: Type AB individuals can give blood only to other AB individuals, but can receive blood of any type.

Blood types are further organized by Rh factor:

  • Rh-positive: People with Rh-positive blood have Rh antigens on the surface of their red blood cells. People with Rh-positive blood can receive Rh-positive or Rh-negative blood.
  • Rh-negative: People with Rh-negative blood do not have Rh antigens. People with Rh-negative blood can receive only blood that is also Rh-negative.

ABO Rh ( Blood )

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EDTASCS EDTA 60 Same Day

Blood typing is a test that determines a person’s blood type. The test is essential if you need a blood transfusion or are planning to donate blood. Not all blood types are compatible, so it’s important to know your blood group. Receiving blood that’s incompatible with your blood type could trigger a dangerous immune response. ABO Rh ( Blood ) is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

The blood types

Your blood type is determined by what kind of antigens your red blood cells have on the surface. Antigens are substances that help your body differentiate between its own cells and foreign, potentially dangerous ones. If your body thinks a cell is foreign, it will set out to destroy it. The ABO blood typing system groups your blood into one of four categories:
  • Type A has the A antigen.
  • Type B has the B antigen.
  • Type AB has both A and B antigens.
  • Type O has neither A nor B antigens.
If blood with antigens that you don’t have enters your system, your body will create antibodies against it. However, some people can still safely receive blood that isn’t their blood type. As long as the blood they receive doesn’t have any antigens that mark it as foreign, their bodies won’t attack it.

In other words, donations work as follows:

  • O: Type O individuals can donate blood to anyone, because their blood has no antigens. However, they can only receive blood from other type O individuals (because blood with any antigens is seen as foreign).
  • A: Type A individuals can donate to other type A individuals and type AB individuals. Type A individuals can receive blood only from other type A individuals and type O individuals.
  • B: Type B individuals can donate blood to other B individuals and AB individuals. Type B individuals can receive blood only from type B individuals and type O individuals.
  • AB: Type AB individuals can give blood only to other AB individuals, but can receive blood of any type.

Blood types are further organized by Rh factor:

  • Rh-positive: People with Rh-positive blood have Rh antigens on the surface of their red blood cells. People with Rh-positive blood can receive Rh-positive or Rh-negative blood.
  • Rh-negative: People with Rh-negative blood do not have Rh antigens. People with Rh-negative blood can receive only blood that is also Rh-negative.

ABS Eosinophil count

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ABS Eosinophil count EDTA Blood/Slides smear 100 same day

White blood cells are an important part of your body’s immune system. They’re vital to protecting you from invading bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Your bone marrow produces all five of the different kinds of white blood cells in the body. Each white blood cell lives anywhere from several hours to several days in the blood stream. An eosinophil is a type of white blood cell. Eosinophils are stored in tissues throughout the body, surviving for up to several weeks. The bone marrow continually replenishes the body’s white blood cell supply. The number and type of each white blood cell in your body can give doctors a better understanding of your health. Elevated levels of white blood cells in your blood can be an indicator that you have an illness or infection. Elevated levels often mean your body is sending more and more white blood cells to fight off infections. An eosinophil count is a blood test that measures the quantity of eosinophils in your body. Abnormal eosinophil levels are often discovered as part of a routine complete blood count (CBC) test. Ongoing research continues to uncover an expanding list of roles performed by eosinophils. It appears now that nearly every system of the body relies on eosinophils in some way. Two important functions are within your immune system. Eosinophils destroy invading germs like viruses, bacteria, or parasites such as hookworms. They also have a role in the inflammatory response, especially if an allergy is involved. Inflammation is neither good nor bad. It helps isolate and control the immune response at the site of an infection, but a side effect is tissue damage around it. Allergies are immune responses that often involve chronic inflammation. Eosinophils play a significant role in the inflammation related to allergies, eczema, and asthma.

Why do I need an eosinophil count?

Your doctor may discover abnormal eosinophil levels when a white blood count differential is performed. A WBC  differential test is often done alongside a complete blood count (CBC) and determines the percentage of each kind of white blood cell present in your blood. This test will show if you have an abnormally high or low count of white blood cells. White blood cell counts can vary in certain diseases. Your doctor may also order this test if they suspect specific diseases or conditions, such as:
  • an extreme allergic reaction
  • a drug reaction
  • certain parasitic infections

How do I prepare for an eosinophil count?

There are no special preparations necessary for this test. You should inform your doctor if you’re taking any blood-thinning drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin). Your doctor may advise you to stop taking certain medications. Medications that may cause you to have an increased eosinophil count include:
  • diet pills
  • interferon, which is a drug that helps treat infection
  • some antibiotics
  • laxatives that contain psyllium
  • tranquilizers
Before the test, be sure to tell your doctor about any current medications or supplements you’re taking.

ABS Eosinophil count

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ABS Eosinophil count EDTA Blood/Slides smear 100 Same Day

White blood cells are an important part of your body’s immune system. They’re vital to protecting you from invading bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Your bone marrow produces all five of the different kinds of white blood cells in the body. Each white blood cell lives anywhere from several hours to several days in the blood stream. An eosinophil is a type of white blood cell. Eosinophils are stored in tissues throughout the body, surviving for up to several weeks. The bone marrow continually replenishes the body’s white blood cell supply. The number and type of each white blood cell in your body can give doctors a better understanding of your health. Elevated levels of white blood cells in your blood can be an indicator that you have an illness or infection. Elevated levels often mean your body is sending more and more white blood cells to fight off infections. An eosinophil count is a blood test that measures the quantity of eosinophils in your body. Abnormal eosinophil levels are often discovered as part of a routine complete blood count (CBC) test. Ongoing research continues to uncover an expanding list of roles performed by eosinophils. It appears now that nearly every system of the body relies on eosinophils in some way. Two important functions are within your immune system. Eosinophils destroy invading germs like viruses, bacteria, or parasites such as hookworms. They also have a role in the inflammatory response, especially if an allergy is involved. Inflammation is neither good nor bad. It helps isolate and control the immune response at the site of an infection, but a side effect is tissue damage around it. Allergies are immune responses that often involve chronic inflammation. Eosinophils play a significant role in the inflammation related to allergies, eczema, and asthma.

Why do I need an eosinophil count?

Your doctor may discover abnormal eosinophil levels when a white blood count differential is performed. A WBC  differential test is often done alongside a complete blood count (CBC) and determines the percentage of each kind of white blood cell present in your blood. This test will show if you have an abnormally high or low count of white blood cells. White blood cell counts can vary in certain diseases. Your doctor may also order this test if they suspect specific diseases or conditions, such as:
  • an extreme allergic reaction
  • a drug reaction
  • certain parasitic infections

How do I prepare for an eosinophil count?

There are no special preparations necessary for this test. You should inform your doctor if you’re taking any blood-thinning drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin). Your doctor may advise you to stop taking certain medications. Medications that may cause you to have an increased eosinophil count include:
  • diet pills
  • interferon, which is a drug that helps treat infection
  • some antibiotics
  • laxatives that contain psyllium
  • tranquilizers
Before the test, be sure to tell your doctor about any current medications or supplements you’re taking.

ABS. c

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ABS. neutrophil count serum 60 same day

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell. In fact, most of the white blood cells that lead the immune system’s response are neutrophils. There are four other types of white blood cells. Neutrophils are the most plentiful type, making up 55 to 70 percent of your white blood cells. White blood cells, also called leukocytes, are a key part of your immune system. Your immune system is made up of tissues, organs, and cells. As part of this complex system, white blood cells patrol your bloodstream and lymphatic system. When you’re sick or have a minor injury, substances that your body sees as foreign, known as antigens, call your immune system into action. Examples of antigens include:
  • bacteria
  • viruses
  • fungi
  • poisons
  • cancer cells
White blood cells produce chemicals that fight antigens by going to the source of the infection or inflammation. Neutrophils are important because, unlike some of the other white blood cells, they aren’t limited to a specific area of circulation. They can move freely through the walls of veins and into the tissues of your body to immediately attack all antigens.
Absolute neutrophil count (ANC)
An absolute neutrophil count (ANC) can provide your doctor with important clues about your health. An ANC is typically ordered as part of a complete blood count (CBC) with differential. A CBC measures the cells that are in your blood. Your doctor may order an ANC:
  • to screen for a number of conditions
  • to help diagnose a condition
  • to monitor your status if you have an existing disease or if you’re undergoing chemotherapy
If your ANC is abnormal, your doctor will likely want to repeat the blood test multiple times over a period of weeks. This way, they can monitor for changes in your neutrophil count.

What to expect

For the ANC test, a small amount of blood will be drawn, usually from a vein in your arm. This will happen at your doctor’s office or in a lab. The blood will be evaluated in a laboratory and the results will be sent to your doctor. Certain conditions can affect the results of your blood test. Be sure to tell your doctor if you’re pregnant, or if you’ve had any of the following:
  • a recent infection
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation therapy
  • corticosteroid therapy
  • recent surgery
  • anxiety
  • HIV

Understanding the results

 

Acetone (Blood)

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Acetone (Blood) serum 380 6 Days

Acetone test is performed on a sample of blood serum to measure level of Acetone in blood serum.It is performed to confirm Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria and Starvation and also during treatment and after treatment of Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria and Starvation.

Preparation for Acetone Blood Serum

No special preparation is needed for Acetone Blood Serum. Inform your doctor if you are on any medications or have any underlying medical conditions or allergies before undergoing Acetone Blood Serum. Your doctor depending on your condition will give specific instructions.

Normal values for Acetone Blood Serum

The normal result for Acetone Blood Serum for Acetone is < 1 mg/dL for Unisex gender and for All age groups.

A serum ketones test determines the levels of ketones in your blood. Ketones are a byproduct produced when your body uses only fat, instead of glucose, for energy. Ketones aren’t harmful in small amounts. When ketones accumulate in the blood, the body enters ketosis. For some people, ketosis is normal. Low-carbohydrate diets can induce this state. This is sometimes called nutritional ketosis. If you have type 1 diabetes, you may be at risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is a life-threatening complication in which your blood becomes too acidic. It can lead to a diabetic coma or death. Contact your doctor immediately if you have diabetes and have a moderate or high reading for ketones. Some newer blood glucose meters will test blood ketone levels. Otherwise, you can use urine ketone strips to measure your urine ketone level. DKA can develop within 24 hours and can lead to life-threatening conditions if left untreated. Although it’s rare, people with type 2 diabetes do develop DKA, according to Diabetes Forecast. Some people may also have alcoholic ketoacidosis from long-term alcohol abuse or starvation ketoacidosis from fasting too long. Call your doctor immediately if your blood sugar levels are high, your ketone levels are moderate or high, or if you’re feeling:
  • pain in the abdomen
  • nauseated or you’re vomiting for over 4 hours
  • sick with a cold or the flu
  • excessive thirst and symptoms of dehydration
  • flushed, especially on your skin
  • shortness of breath, or breathing rapidly
You may also have a fruity or metallic scent on your breath, and a blood sugar level more than 240 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). All of these symptoms can be warning symptoms of DKA, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
What are the risks of a serum ketone test?
The only complications that come from a serum ketone test come from taking a blood sample. The healthcare provider may have difficulty finding a good vein from which to take the blood sample, and you may have a slight prick sensation or bruising at the site of the needle insertion. These symptoms are temporary and will resolve on their own after the test, or within a few days.

Acetone (Blood)

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Acetone (Blood) serum 380 6 Days

Acetone test is performed on a sample of blood serum to measure level of Acetone in blood serum.It is performed to confirm Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria and Starvation and also during treatment and after treatment of Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria and Starvation.

Preparation for Acetone Blood Serum

No special preparation is needed for Acetone Blood Serum. Inform your doctor if you are on any medications or have any underlying medical conditions or allergies before undergoing Acetone Blood Serum. Your doctor depending on your condition will give specific instructions.

Normal values for Acetone Blood Serum

The normal result for Acetone Blood Serum for Acetone is < 1 mg/dL for Unisex gender and for All age groups.

A serum ketones test determines the levels of ketones in your blood. Ketones are a byproduct produced when your body uses only fat, instead of glucose, for energy. Ketones aren’t harmful in small amounts. When ketones accumulate in the blood, the body enters ketosis. For some people, ketosis is normal. Low-carbohydrate diets can induce this state. This is sometimes called nutritional ketosis. If you have type 1 diabetes, you may be at risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is a life-threatening complication in which your blood becomes too acidic. It can lead to a diabetic coma or death. Contact your doctor immediately if you have diabetes and have a moderate or high reading for ketones. Some newer blood glucose meters will test blood ketone levels. Otherwise, you can use urine ketone strips to measure your urine ketone level. DKA can develop within 24 hours and can lead to life-threatening conditions if left untreated. Although it’s rare, people with type 2 diabetes do develop DKA, according to Diabetes Forecast. Some people may also have alcoholic ketoacidosis from long-term alcohol abuse or starvation ketoacidosis from fasting too long. Call your doctor immediately if your blood sugar levels are high, your ketone levels are moderate or high, or if you’re feeling:
  • pain in the abdomen
  • nauseated or you’re vomiting for over 4 hours
  • sick with a cold or the flu
  • excessive thirst and symptoms of dehydration
  • flushed, especially on your skin
  • shortness of breath, or breathing rapidly
You may also have a fruity or metallic scent on your breath, and a blood sugar level more than 240 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). All of these symptoms can be warning symptoms of DKA, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
What are the risks of a serum ketone test?
The only complications that come from a serum ketone test come from taking a blood sample. The healthcare provider may have difficulty finding a good vein from which to take the blood sample, and you may have a slight prick sensation or bruising at the site of the needle insertion. These symptoms are temporary and will resolve on their own after the test, or within a few days.

Acetone (Urine)

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Acetone (Urine) serum 80 same day

The Acetone-Urine test is a simple urine test to detect the level of acetones in the body. When the acetones in the blood go above a certain level, a number of hormones, including glucagon, epinephrine, and growth hormone can cause fatty acids to be released from body fat (adipose tissue) into the blood. The levels of these hormones increase in starvation, uncontrolled diabetes, and a number of other conditions. This test is also performed to confirm Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria and also during the treatment and after treatment of Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Ketonuria to check the efficacy of the prescribed medicines.

 Preperation For The Acetone (Urine) Test

No special preparation is needed for Acetone-Urine test. You can drink water normally. However, you need to inform the laboratory professional if you are on any medications or have any underlying medical conditions or allergies before undergoing Acetone-Urine test. The laboratory professional depending on your condition will give specific instructions. Also, certain types of diet can alter the test results. For example, a diet low in carbohydrates and high in protein can change the acetone levels. You need to consult the laboratory professional for the same.

 Uses Of Acetone (Urine) Test

As mentioned above this test is used to find the levels of presence of acetones in your body. When acetone develops, it doesn't usually become dangerous right away, but it does cause the blood to become too acidic. In advanced and prolonged cases, it can become serious, damaging internal organs and even proving fatal. Likewise, the presence of acetones in the body of a pregnant woman can harm her unborn child. In such cases it is imperative for the doctor to order this test.

Acid Phosphatase Total

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Acid Phosphatase Total serum 175 same day

Acid Phosphatase - Total test is performed on a sample of blood serum to measure level of Acid Phosphatase - Total in blood serum.It is performed to detect Bone Cancer

Preparation for Acid Phosphatase - Total Blood Serum

No special preparation is needed for Acid Phosphatase - Total Blood Serum. Inform your doctor if you are on any medications or have any underlying medical conditions or allergies before undergoing Acid Phosphatase - Total Blood Serum. Your doctor depending on your condition will give specific instructions.

Normal values for Acid Phosphatase - Total Blood Serum

The normal result for Phosphatase - Total Blood Serum for Acid Phosphatase - Total is 2.5 to 3.7 ng/mL for Unisex gender and for All age groups.

phosphatase is a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyses organic phosphates at an acid pH. Although the postpuberteral prostatic epithelial cell contains a uniquely high concentration of acid phosphatase, cellular components of bone, spleen, kidney, liver, intestine, and blood also contain this enzyme. The discovery that prostatic carcinoma cells often retain a high concentration of phosphatase characteristic of the normal postpubertal gland led to the recognition of the first clinically useful tumor marker. Recognition that the serum of patients with prostatic malignancy frequently contains an increased concentration of this enzyme has resulted in persistent efforts to identify the source, to accurately quantitate the level of serum acid phosphatase, and to determine the clinical significance of those levels. A variety of enzymatic and immunologic techniques have been employed to measure acid phosphatase. In the past, various substrates and inhibitors were utilized to increase specificity and sensitivity. Emphasis has now shifted to the development of radioimmunoassay and counterimmunoelectrophoresis in an attempt to enhance those parameters. Judgment of their efficacy awaits further testing and evaluation. The clinical significance of normal and abnormal serum phosphatase is constantly being reevaluated. In order to maximize the value of laboratory measurements, the clinical and pathologic status of the patient, the techniques employed in obtaining and storing the blood sample and the procedures used in analysis must be known and considered. Traditionally, the serum prostatic phosphatase has been thought to originate in the prostatic cancer cell and has been used to stage the disease. Until recently, elevated serum values have been accepted as an indication of extraprostatic disease, and were thought to rule out lesions confined to the prostate. The elevation of phosphatase levels in patients with disseminated disease or the failure of elevated levels to return to normal with treatment have been assumed to indicate a poor prognosis. However, unequivocal documentation of the validity of these statements is not available. Newer immunologic techniques for measuring phosphatase may significantly alter our current concept of its role as a tumor marker.

ADA

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ADA serum 500 4 Days

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a protein that is produced by cells throughout the body and is associated with the activation of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that plays a role in the immune response to infections. Conditions that trigger the immune system, such as an infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB), may cause increased amounts of ADA to be produced in the areas where the bacteria are present. This test measures the amount of adenosine deaminase present in pleural fluid in order to help diagnose a tuberculosis infection of the pleurae. Pleurae are membranes that cover the chest cavity and the outside of each lung. Small amounts of pleural fluid are continuously produced to lubricate the movement of the lungs against these membranes and the membranes against each other during inhalation and exhalation. A variety of conditions and diseases, including infection, can cause inflammation of the pleurae (pleurisy or pleuritis) and can lead to excessive pleural fluid accumulation (pleural effusion). Tuberculosis can spread into the lungs and pleurae, causing symptoms such as chest pain, chronic cough, and shortness of breath. Since these symptoms may also be seen with a variety of other conditions, it is important to determine the cause as rapidly as possible in order to properly treat the affected person. Detecting mycobacteria in pleural fluid can be difficult because there may be a large volume of fluid and very low numbers of bacteria present. Though the ADA test is not specific and does not replace the culture for diagnosing TB, it may be positive even when numbers of bacteria are very low and can be used as an adjunct test to help determine whether tuberculosis is the likely source of a person's symptoms.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A sample of pleural fluid is collected by a healthcare practitioner with a syringe and needle using a procedure called thoracentesis. Rarely, other body fluid samples, such as peritoneal or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), are collected using procedures specific to the fluid type.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

AFB Culture ( Convectional Method)

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AFB Culture Blood/pus/serum /sputam/ urine 300 47 Days

Most samples that are submitted for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) testing are collected because the health practitioner suspects that a person has tuberculosis (TB), a lung infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteria are called acid-fast bacilli because they are a group of rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) that can be seen under the microscope following a staining procedure where the bacteria retain the color of the stain after an acid wash (acid-fast). AFB laboratory tests detect the bacteria in a person's sample and help identify an infection caused by AFB. There are a several types of AFB that may be detected with this testing; however, the most common and medically important ones are members of the genus Mycobacterium. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent and infectious species of mycobacteria. AFB is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Since TB is transmitted through the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs, speaks, or sings, it is a public health risk. It can spread in confined populations, such as in the home and schools, correctional facilities, and nursing homes. Those who are very young, elderly, or have preexisting diseases and conditions, such as AIDS, that compromise their immune systems tend to be especially vulnerable. AFB testing can help track and minimize the spread of TB in these populations and help determine the effectiveness of treatment. Another group of mycobacteria referred to as nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also cause infections. However, only a few of the more than 60 species of mycobacteria that have been identified cause infections in humans. Some examples include Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC), which can cause a lung infection in people with weakened immune systems, and Mycobacterium marinum, which can cause skin infections. (See the article on Nontuberculous Mycobacteria for more details on different types). In addition to TB, AFB testing can help identify infections caused by these nontuberculous mycobacteria. AFB laboratory tests include: AFB smear — a microscopic examination of a person's specimen that is stained to detect acid-fast bacteria. This test can provide presumptive results within a few hours. It is a valuable tool in helping to make decisions about treatment while culture results are pending. Molecular tests for TB (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT) — detect the genetic components of mycobacteria and are often done when the AFB smear is positive or TB is highly suspected. Like AFB smears, they can provide a presumptive diagnosis, which can aid in the decision of whether to begin treatment before culture results are available. Results of NAAT are typically available several hours after a sample is collected. AFB cultures to grow the bacteria are set up at the same time as the AFB smears. Though more sensitive than AFB smears, results of cultures may take days to several weeks. Susceptibility testing on the acid-fast bacteria grown in the cultures that are positive will determine the organism's susceptibility or resistance to drugs most commonly used to treat the infection. How is the sample collected for testing? Since M. tuberculosis and M. avium most frequently infect the lungs (pulmonary disease), sputum is the most commonly tested sample. Sputum is phlegm, thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. Usually, three early morning samples are collected on consecutive days in individual sterile cups to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria. If a person is unable to produce sputum, a health practitioner may collect respiratory samples using a procedure called a bronchoscopy. Bronchoscopy allows the health practitioner to look at and collect samples from the bronchi and bronchioles. Once a local anesthetic has been sprayed onto the patient's upper airway, the practitioner can insert a tube into the bronchi and smaller bronchioles and aspirate fluid samples for testing. Sometimes, the health practitioner will introduce a small amount of saline through the tubing and into the bronchi and then aspirate it to collect a bronchial washing. Since young children cannot produce a sputum sample, gastric washings/aspirates may be collected. This involves introducing saline into the stomach through a tube, followed by fluid aspiration. If the health practitioner suspects TB is present outside of the lungs (extrapulmonary), a condition fairly common in AIDS patients, he or she may test the body fluids and tissues most likely affected. For instance, one or more urine samples may be collected if the practitioner suspects TB has infected the kidneys. A needle may used to collect fluid from joints or from other body cavities, such as the pericardium or abdomen. Occasionally, the practitioner may collect a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or perform a minor surgical procedure to obtain a tissue biopsy. Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample? No test preparation is needed.

AFB Culture ( Convectional Method)

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AFB Culture Blood/pus/serum /sputam/ urine 300 47 Days

Most samples that are submitted for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) testing are collected because the health practitioner suspects that a person has tuberculosis (TB), a lung infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteria are called acid-fast bacilli because they are a group of rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) that can be seen under the microscope following a staining procedure where the bacteria retain the color of the stain after an acid wash (acid-fast). AFB laboratory tests detect the bacteria in a person's sample and help identify an infection caused by AFB. There are a several types of AFB that may be detected with this testing; however, the most common and medically important ones are members of the genus Mycobacterium. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent and infectious species of mycobacteria. AFB is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Since TB is transmitted through the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs, speaks, or sings, it is a public health risk. It can spread in confined populations, such as in the home and schools, correctional facilities, and nursing homes. Those who are very young, elderly, or have preexisting diseases and conditions, such as AIDS, that compromise their immune systems tend to be especially vulnerable. AFB testing can help track and minimize the spread of TB in these populations and help determine the effectiveness of treatment. Another group of mycobacteria referred to as nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also cause infections. However, only a few of the more than 60 species of mycobacteria that have been identified cause infections in humans. Some examples include Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC), which can cause a lung infection in people with weakened immune systems, and Mycobacterium marinum, which can cause skin infections. (See the article on Nontuberculous Mycobacteria for more details on different types). In addition to TB, AFB testing can help identify infections caused by these nontuberculous mycobacteria. AFB laboratory tests include: AFB smear — a microscopic examination of a person's specimen that is stained to detect acid-fast bacteria. This test can provide presumptive results within a few hours. It is a valuable tool in helping to make decisions about treatment while culture results are pending. Molecular tests for TB (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT) — detect the genetic components of mycobacteria and are often done when the AFB smear is positive or TB is highly suspected. Like AFB smears, they can provide a presumptive diagnosis, which can aid in the decision of whether to begin treatment before culture results are available. Results of NAAT are typically available several hours after a sample is collected. AFB cultures to grow the bacteria are set up at the same time as the AFB smears. Though more sensitive than AFB smears, results of cultures may take days to several weeks. Susceptibility testing on the acid-fast bacteria grown in the cultures that are positive will determine the organism's susceptibility or resistance to drugs most commonly used to treat the infection. How is the sample collected for testing? Since M. tuberculosis and M. avium most frequently infect the lungs (pulmonary disease), sputum is the most commonly tested sample. Sputum is phlegm, thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. Usually, three early morning samples are collected on consecutive days in individual sterile cups to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria. If a person is unable to produce sputum, a health practitioner may collect respiratory samples using a procedure called a bronchoscopy. Bronchoscopy allows the health practitioner to look at and collect samples from the bronchi and bronchioles. Once a local anesthetic has been sprayed onto the patient's upper airway, the practitioner can insert a tube into the bronchi and smaller bronchioles and aspirate fluid samples for testing. Sometimes, the health practitioner will introduce a small amount of saline through the tubing and into the bronchi and then aspirate it to collect a bronchial washing. Since young children cannot produce a sputum sample, gastric washings/aspirates may be collected. This involves introducing saline into the stomach through a tube, followed by fluid aspiration. If the health practitioner suspects TB is present outside of the lungs (extrapulmonary), a condition fairly common in AIDS patients, he or she may test the body fluids and tissues most likely affected. For instance, one or more urine samples may be collected if the practitioner suspects TB has infected the kidneys. A needle may used to collect fluid from joints or from other body cavities, such as the pericardium or abdomen. Occasionally, the practitioner may collect a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or perform a minor surgical procedure to obtain a tissue biopsy. Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample? No test preparation is needed.

AFB Culture ( Rapid Method)

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AFB Culture DO 1000 20 Days

Most samples that are submitted for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) testing are collected because the health practitioner suspects that a person has tuberculosis (TB), a lung infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteria are called acid-fast bacilli because they are a group of rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) that can be seen under the microscope following a staining procedure where the bacteria retain the color of the stain after an acid wash (acid-fast). AFB laboratory tests detect the bacteria in a person's sample and help identify an infection caused by AFB. There are a several types of AFB that may be detected with this testing; however, the most common and medically important ones are members of the genus Mycobacterium. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent and infectious species of mycobacteria. AFB is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Since TB is transmitted through the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs, speaks, or sings, it is a public health risk. It can spread in confined populations, such as in the home and schools, correctional facilities, and nursing homes. Those who are very young, elderly, or have preexisting diseases and conditions, such as AIDS, that compromise their immune systems tend to be especially vulnerable. AFB testing can help track and minimize the spread of TB in these populations and help determine the effectiveness of treatment. Another group of mycobacteria referred to as nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also cause infections. However, only a few of the more than 60 species of mycobacteria that have been identified cause infections in humans. Some examples include Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC), which can cause a lung infection in people with weakened immune systems, and Mycobacterium marinum, which can cause skin infections. (See the article on Nontuberculous Mycobacteria for more details on different types). In addition to TB, AFB testing can help identify infections caused by these nontuberculous mycobacteria.

AFB laboratory tests include:

  • AFB smear — a microscopic examination of a person's specimen that is stained to detect acid-fast bacteria. This test can provide presumptive results within a few hours. It is a valuable tool in helping to make decisions about treatment while culture results are pending.
  • Molecular tests for TB (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT) — detect the genetic components of mycobacteria and are often done when the AFB smear is positive or TB is highly suspected. Like AFB smears, they can provide a presumptive diagnosis, which can aid in the decision of whether to begin treatment before culture results are available. Results of NAAT are typically available several hours after a sample is collected.
  • AFB cultures to grow the bacteria are set up at the same time as the AFB smears. Though more sensitive than AFB smears, results of cultures may take days to several weeks.
  • Susceptibility testing on the acid-fast bacteria grown in the cultures that are positive will determine the organism's susceptibility or resistance to drugs most commonly used to treat the infection.

How is the sample collected for testing?

Since M. tuberculosis and M. avium most frequently infect the lungs (pulmonary disease), sputum is the most commonly tested sample. Sputum is phlegm, thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. Usually, three early morning samples are collected on consecutive days in individual sterile cups to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria. If a person is unable to produce sputum, a health practitioner may collect respiratory samples using a procedure called a bronchoscopy. Bronchoscopy allows the health practitioner to look at and collect samples from the bronchi and bronchioles. Once a local anesthetic has been sprayed onto the patient's upper airway, the practitioner can insert a tube into the bronchi and smaller bronchioles and aspirate fluid samples for testing. Sometimes, the health practitioner will introduce a small amount of saline through the tubing and into the bronchi and then aspirate it to collect a bronchial washing. Since young children cannot produce a sputum sample, gastric washings/aspirates may be collected. This involves introducing saline into the stomach through a tube, followed by fluid aspiration. If the health practitioner suspects TB is present outside of the lungs (extrapulmonary), a condition fairly common in AIDS patients, he or she may test the body fluids and tissues most likely affected. For instance, one or more urine samples may be collected if the practitioner suspects TB has infected the kidneys. A needle may used to collect fluid from joints or from other body cavities, such as the pericardium or abdomen. Occasionally, the practitioner may collect a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or perform a minor surgical procedure to obtain a tissue biopsy.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

AFB Culture ( Rapid Method)

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AFB Culture DO 1000 20 Days

Most samples that are submitted for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) testing are collected because the health practitioner suspects that a person has tuberculosis (TB), a lung infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteria are called acid-fast bacilli because they are a group of rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) that can be seen under the microscope following a staining procedure where the bacteria retain the color of the stain after an acid wash (acid-fast). AFB laboratory tests detect the bacteria in a person's sample and help identify an infection caused by AFB. There are a several types of AFB that may be detected with this testing; however, the most common and medically important ones are members of the genus MycobacteriumMycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent and infectious species of mycobacteria. AFB is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Since TB is transmitted through the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs, speaks, or sings, it is a public health risk. It can spread in confined populations, such as in the home and schools, correctional facilities, and nursing homes. Those who are very young, elderly, or have preexisting diseases and conditions, such as AIDS, that compromise their immune systems tend to be especially vulnerable. AFB testing can help track and minimize the spread of TB in these populations and help determine the effectiveness of treatment. Another group of mycobacteria referred to as nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also cause infections. However, only a few of the more than 60 species of mycobacteria that have been identified cause infections in humans. Some examples include Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC), which can cause a lung infection in people with weakened immune systems, and Mycobacterium marinum, which can cause skin infections. (See the article on Nontuberculous Mycobacteria for more details on different types). In addition to TB, AFB testing can help identify infections caused by these nontuberculous mycobacteria.

AFB laboratory tests include:

  • AFB smear — a microscopic examination of a person's specimen that is stained to detect acid-fast bacteria. This test can provide presumptive results within a few hours. It is a valuable tool in helping to make decisions about treatment while culture results are pending.
  • Molecular tests for TB (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT) — detect the genetic components of mycobacteria and are often done when the AFB smear is positive or TB is highly suspected. Like AFB smears, they can provide a presumptive diagnosis, which can aid in the decision of whether to begin treatment before culture results are available. Results of NAAT are typically available several hours after a sample is collected.
  • AFB cultures to grow the bacteria are set up at the same time as the AFB smears. Though more sensitive than AFB smears, results of cultures may take days to several weeks.
  • Susceptibility testing on the acid-fast bacteria grown in the cultures that are positive will determine the organism's susceptibility or resistance to drugs most commonly used to treat the infection.

How is the sample collected for testing?

Since M. tuberculosis and M. avium most frequently infect the lungs (pulmonary disease), sputum is the most commonly tested sample. Sputum is phlegm, thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. Usually, three early morning samples are collected on consecutive days in individual sterile cups to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria. If a person is unable to produce sputum, a health practitioner may collect respiratory samples using a procedure called a bronchoscopy. Bronchoscopy allows the health practitioner to look at and collect samples from the bronchi and bronchioles. Once a local anesthetic has been sprayed onto the patient's upper airway, the practitioner can insert a tube into the bronchi and smaller bronchioles and aspirate fluid samples for testing. Sometimes, the health practitioner will introduce a small amount of saline through the tubing and into the bronchi and then aspirate it to collect a bronchial washing. Since young children cannot produce a sputum sample, gastric washings/aspirates may be collected. This involves introducing saline into the stomach through a tube, followed by fluid aspiration. If the health practitioner suspects TB is present outside of the lungs (extrapulmonary), a condition fairly common in AIDS patients, he or she may test the body fluids and tissues most likely affected. For instance, one or more urine samples may be collected if the practitioner suspects TB has infected the kidneys. A needle may used to collect fluid from joints or from other body cavities, such as the pericardium or abdomen. Occasionally, the practitioner may collect a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or perform a minor surgical procedure to obtain a tissue biopsy.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL)

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AFB Sputam Sputam 80 3 Days

A sputum stain for Mycobacteria is a laboratory test performed on a sample of your sputum, or phlegm. It’s also known as an acid-fast bacillus (AFB) stain or a tuberculosis (TB) smear. A doctor typically orders the AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL) test to determine if a person has tuberculosis (TB) or another type of mycobacterial infection. If you’re already taking medication for TB or another mycobacterial infection, your doctor might order the test to find out if your medication is working. SPUTAM  test is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

Why the AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL) Test Is Ordered

Your doctor will order this test if they think you have a mycobacterial infection. Mycobacteria are a type of microorganism with nearly 100 known species. The most common type is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB.

The general symptoms of TB include:

  • coughing up blood or mucus
  • a lack of appetite
  • weight loss
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • a fever
  • chills
  • night sweats
Another fairly common type of this bacteria is Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy. The symptoms of leprosy include:
  • skin discoloration
  • skin lesions
  • skin nodules
  • skin plaques
  • thickened skin
  • nasal congestion
  • nosebleeds
Except for the two microorganisms that cause TB and leprosy, most Mycobacteria exist in the water and soil everywhere in the world. These are called nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM live in:
  • city water
  • bayous
  • rivers
  • hot tubs
  • swimming pools
  • yard soil
  • food
Their tough, waxy cell wall makes them resistant to antibacterial agents. Although NTM are everywhere, most people aren’t affected. People with immunity problems, such as AIDS, are vulnerable to infection. Some people can have an infection with no symptoms at all. Other people have infections that cause lung symptoms similar to TB. Medicines can treat these infections, but it often takes more than one medicine to cure them.

AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL)

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AFB Sputam Sputam 80 3 Days

A sputum stain for Mycobacteria is a laboratory test performed on a sample of your sputumor phlegm. It’s also known as an acid-fast bacillus (AFB) stain or a tuberculosis (TB) smear. A doctor typically orders the AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL) test to determine if a person has tuberculosis (TB) or another type of mycobacterial infection. If you’re already taking medication for TB or another mycobacterial infection, your doctor might order the test to find out if your medication is working. SPUTAM  test is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

Why the AFB SPUTAM (NORMAL) Test Is Ordered

Your doctor will order this test if they think you have a mycobacterial infection. Mycobacteria are a type of microorganism with nearly 100 known species. The most common type is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB.

The general symptoms of TB include:

  • coughing up blood or mucus
  • a lack of appetite
  • weight loss
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • a fever
  • chills
  • night sweats
Another fairly common type of this bacteria is Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy. The symptoms of leprosy include:
  • skin discoloration
  • skin lesions
  • skin nodules
  • skin plaques
  • thickened skin
  • nasal congestion
  • nosebleeds
Except for the two microorganisms that cause TB and leprosy, most Mycobacteria exist in the water and soil everywhere in the world. These are called nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM live in:
  • city water
  • bayous
  • rivers
  • hot tubs
  • swimming pools
  • yard soil
  • food
Their tough, waxy cell wall makes them resistant to antibacterial agents. Although NTM are everywhere, most people aren’t affected. People with immunity problems, such as AIDS, are vulnerable to infection. Some people can have an infection with no symptoms at all. Other people have infections that cause lung symptoms similar to TB. Medicines can treat these infections, but it often takes more than one medicine to cure them.

AFP(alpha feto protein) blood amnionic fluid

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AFP serum/amnionic 700 6 Days

An alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) test is a blood test that measures the amount of AFP present in blood. It’s usually part of what’s called a triple screen or quad screen in the second trimester of pregnancy. However, it can also be useful for adults who aren’t pregnant. The yolk sac, GI tract, and liver of an unborn baby produce AFP. It then circulates through the fetal and maternal blood. Individuals who aren’t pregnant still have some AFP in their blood, but levels are normally low. High levels of AFP in adults who aren’t pregnant usually indicate certain types of liver disease.

Why do I need an alpha-fetoprotein test?

An AFP test is a routine screening test that’s given to expectant mothers between the 14th and 22nd weeks of their pregnancy. It is most accurate between the 16th and 18th weeks, so it’s important to know exactly when you became pregnant. AFP testing is usually part of a quad screen. This screening exam also tests your levels of:
  • human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)
  • estriol, which is a hormone produced by your placenta and your baby’s liver
  • inhibin A, which is a hormone produced by your placenta
Doctors will use your quad screen results, your age, and your ethnicity to help determine the chances that your unborn baby has a genetic birth defect. Defects detected by this type of screening can include neural tube defects, such as spina bifida, and chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The AFP results will help your doctor determine if you need further tests for these conditions. A positive test doesn’t necessarily mean your unborn baby will have a birth defect. The AFP test is especially important for women who are at high risk of having children with birth defects, including women:
  • who are 35 or older
  • with a family history of birth defects
  • who used harmful medications or drugs during their pregnancies
  • who have diabetes
If you aren’t pregnant, an AFP test can help to diagnose and monitor certain liver conditions, such as liver cancer, cirrhosis, and hepatitis. It can also help detect several other cancers, including cancers of the:
  • testes
  • ovaries
  • biliary tract
  • stomach
  • pancreas

AFP(alpha feto protein) blood amnionic fluid

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AFP serum/amnionic 700 6 Days

An alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) test is a blood test that measures the amount of AFP present in blood. It’s usually part of what’s called a triple screen or quad screen in the second trimester of pregnancy. However, it can also be useful for adults who aren’t pregnant. The yolk sac, GI tract, and liver of an unborn baby produce AFP. It then circulates through the fetal and maternal blood. Individuals who aren’t pregnant still have some AFP in their blood, but levels are normally low. High levels of AFP in adults who aren’t pregnant usually indicate certain types of liver disease.

Why do I need an alpha-fetoprotein test?

An AFP test is a routine screening test that’s given to expectant mothers between the 14th and 22nd weeks of their pregnancy. It is most accurate between the 16th and 18th weeks, so it’s important to know exactly when you became pregnant. AFP testing is usually part of a quad screen. This screening exam also tests your levels of:
  • human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)
  • estriol, which is a hormone produced by your placenta and your baby’s liver
  • inhibin A, which is a hormone produced by your placenta
Doctors will use your quad screen results, your age, and your ethnicity to help determine the chances that your unborn baby has a genetic birth defect. Defects detected by this type of screening can include neural tube defects, such as spina bifida, and chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The AFP results will help your doctor determine if you need further tests for these conditions. A positive test doesn’t necessarily mean your unborn baby will have a birth defect. The AFP test is especially important for women who are at high risk of having children with birth defects, including women:
  • who are 35 or older
  • with a family history of birth defects
  • who used harmful medications or drugs during their pregnancies
  • who have diabetes
If you aren’t pregnant, an AFP test can help to diagnose and monitor certain liver conditions, such as liver cancer, cirrhosis, and hepatitis. It can also help detect several other cancers, including cancers of the:
  • testes
  • ovaries
  • biliary tract
  • stomach
  • pancreas

Albumin

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Albumin Serum 120 same day

Proteins circulate throughout your blood to help your body maintain fluid balance. Albumin is a type of protein the liver makes. It’s one of the most abundant proteins in your blood. You need a proper balance of albumin to keep fluid from leaking out of blood vessels. Albumins gives your body the proteins it needs to keep growing and repairing tissue. It also carries vital nutrients and hormones. A serum albumins test is a simple blood test that measures the amount of albumins in your blood. Having surgery, getting burned, or having an open wound raises your chances of having a low albumins level. If none of those apply to you and you have an abnormal serum albumins level, it may be a sign that your liver or kidneys aren’t working correctly. It could also mean that you have a nutritional deficiency. Your doctor will interpret what your albumins levels mean for your health.

Why is a serum albumin test done?

Your liver takes proteins from the foods you eat and turns them into new proteins that circulate to various organs and tissues in your body. A serum albumin test can tell your doctor how well your liver is working. It’s often one of the tests in a liver panel. In addition to albumin, a liver panel tests your blood for creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and prealbumin. If your doctor suspects that you have a condition that affects your liver function, such as liver disease, you’ll likely need to give a small blood sample for an albumin test. Symptoms associated with liver disease include:
  • jaundice, which is yellow skin and eyes
  • fatigue
  • unexpected weight loss
  • swelling around your eyes, stomach, or legs
Your doctor can also use a serum albumin test to check up on certain medical conditions you have, including chronic pancreatitis or kidney disease. The results of the test can indicate whether such conditions are improving or getting worse.

Alcohol

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Alcohol serum/Random Urin 1100 5 Days

Agencies, companies and many others use urine alcohol tests. How long after the drinking can urine alcohol tests detect it? Depends.

Two Kinds of Urine Alcohol Tests

There are two kinds of urine alcohols tests. The first identifies the presence of  alcohols in urine. After a person drinks alcohols, some breaks down in the body. Some leaves through the breath, perspiration, feces, and urine. But the test has a weakness. It can’t identify alcohols in the urine for very long after all alcohols has left the body.And alcohols leaves the body rather quickly. To estimate that speed. A yeast, Candida Albicans, causes another weakness of this type of urine alcohols test. The body commonly contains this yeast. Unfortunately, it can change sugar in the urine into alcohols. And it can do this while urine is in the bladder or in the sample vial. This is an especially serious problem for diabetics

Etg Test

A second type of alcohols urine test doesn’t look  for alcohols. It looks for  one of the by-products caused as it breaks down in the body. That substance is Ethyl Glucuronide (EtG). An EtG test advantage is that EtG remains in the body long after all the alcohols is gone. The exact length of time is unclear. It probably depends on a number of factors. Claims vary. Some say that EtG can last “up to 70 to 80 hours.” Others say “approximately 80 hours.” Or “up to 80 hours,” “3 to four days,” etc. Such claims usually come from those who sell the tests. Independent researchers tend to report much shorter times, such as 24 hours.

Wide Uses

Because they can test for longer periods of time than traditional urine alcohols tests, they have wider uses. They are appropriate when a person must be totally abstinent for a certain length of time.  It could be either temporarily or permanently. Here are examples.
  • People under the legal drinking age. Also members of the military services in combat zones where they may not drink.
  • People on probation for alcohol-related crimes.
  • People who have previous alcohol problems but have visitation with, or custody of, children. This on condition that they drink no alcohol.
  • Drivers guilty of alcohol-related traffic offenses who must abstain. This is needed for keeping their licenses.
  • Professionals who, because of alcohol problems, agree to abstain. This is a condition for continued licensure or employment. Such professionals include airline pilots, medical personnel, and lawyers,
In addition, clinicians can use EtG urine alcohol tests to motivate clients to be abstinent. Researchers can use the tests to assess the effectiveness of alcohol intervention programs. Parents can use them to discourage underage drinking. Sellers of test kits promote the latter use. However, it is highly controversial. The American Association of Pediatrics discourages the practice. The same is true other leading professional organizations. The many problems associated with such testing may far outweigh any assumed benefits.

Alcohol

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Alcohol serum/Random Urin 1100 5 Days

Agencies, companies and many others use urine alcohol tests. How long after the drinking can urine alcohol tests detect it? Depends.

Two Kinds of Urine Alcohol Tests

There are two kinds of urine alcohols tests. The first identifies the presence of  alcohols in urine. After a person drinks alcohols, some breaks down in the body. Some leaves through the breath, perspiration, feces, and urine. But the test has a weakness. It can’t identify alcohols in the urine for very long after all alcohols has left the body.And alcohols leaves the body rather quickly. To estimate that speed. A yeast, Candida Albicans, causes another weakness of this type of urine alcohols test. The body commonly contains this yeast. Unfortunately, it can change sugar in the urine into alcohols. And it can do this while urine is in the bladder or in the sample vial. This is an especially serious problem for diabetics

Etg Test

A second type of alcohols urine test doesn’t look  for alcohols. It looks for  one of the by-products caused as it breaks down in the body. That substance is Ethyl Glucuronide (EtG). An EtG test advantage is that EtG remains in the body long after all the alcohols is gone. The exact length of time is unclear. It probably depends on a number of factors. Claims vary. Some say that EtG can last “up to 70 to 80 hours.” Others say “approximately 80 hours.” Or “up to 80 hours,” “3 to four days,” etc. Such claims usually come from those who sell the tests. Independent researchers tend to report much shorter times, such as 24 hours.

Wide Uses

Because they can test for longer periods of time than traditional urine alcohols tests, they have wider uses. They are appropriate when a person must be totally abstinent for a certain length of time.  It could be either temporarily or permanently. Here are examples.
  • People under the legal drinking age. Also members of the military services in combat zones where they may not drink.
  • People on probation for alcohol-related crimes.
  • People who have previous alcohol problems but have visitation with, or custody of, children. This on condition that they drink no alcohol.
  • Drivers guilty of alcohol-related traffic offenses who must abstain. This is needed for keeping their licenses.
  • Professionals who, because of alcohol problems, agree to abstain. This is a condition for continued licensure or employment. Such professionals include airline pilots, medical personnel, and lawyers,
In addition, clinicians can use EtG urine alcohol tests to motivate clients to be abstinent. Researchers can use the tests to assess the effectiveness of alcohol intervention programs. Parents can use them to discourage underage drinking. Sellers of test kits promote the latter use. However, it is highly controversial. The American Association of Pediatrics discourages the practice. The same is true other leading professional organizations. The many problems associated with such testing may far outweigh any assumed benefits.

Allergy profile (FOOD/DUST)

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Allergy profile (FOOD/DUST) SERUM 1900 10 Days

Allergies are hypersensitivities, overreactions of the immune system to substances that do not cause reactions in most people. The substances that trigger the overreaction are called allergens.

While anyone can develop an allergy, those with affected family members are at an increased risk. A person who is "predisposed" may not, however, react to the same substances as his or her parents and siblings. It depends upon what allergens the person is exposed to and that person's immune system's response. Hypersensitivities are grouped into four types, I through IV. These classifications are based, to some extent, on what parts of the immune system are activated and how long it takes for a reaction to occur. The two types of hypersensitivities commonly associated with the term "allergies" are:
  • Type I immediate hypersensitivities—people with these types of allergies produce immune proteins called antibodies when exposed to an allergen. The class of antibody produced is called immunoglobulin E (IgE). When these antibodies bind to the allergens, they cause local and sometimes systemic reactions, usually within minutes.
  • Type IV delayed hypersensitivities—these reactions are caused by the interactions of allergens with specific sensitized immune cells, white blood cells called T lymphocytes.
Type I Type I hypersensitivities primarily affect the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems and the skin. The first time a predisposed person is exposed to a potential allergen, that person will not have a major reaction; instead, the person will begin producing IgE antibodies directed against the specific allergen (allergen-specific IgE antibody). Once someone is sensitized in this way, subsequent exposures can result in severe reactions. The IgE antibody produced in response to an allergen binds to mast cells, specialized cells in the tissues, and basophils in the bloodstream. This action primes the immune system. During subsequent exposures to the allergen, the specific bound IgE recognizes the allergen, binds to it, and triggers the release of chemicals, including histamine, causing allergic symptoms that can start in the mouth, nose, or on the skin, wherever the allergen has been introduced. Type I allergic reactions can vary in severity, one time causing a red rash or hives, the next time a serious and life-threatening acute reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis a multi-organ reaction that can start with agitation, a feeling of "impending doom," pale skin due to low blood pressure, and/or a loss of consciousness (fainting). Anaphylaxis can be fatal without the rapid administration of an epinephrine (adrenaline) injection. Type I allergies can be in response to a variety of substances, including but not limited to:
  • Foods
  • Plants such as pollens, weeds, grasses, etc.
  • Insect venoms
  • Animal dander and saliva from cats and dogs, for example
  • Dust mites
  • Mold spores
  • Occupational substances (latex)
  • Drugs such as penicillin
There can also be cross-reactions, where someone allergic to ragweed, for instance, may also react to melons (watermelon or cantaloupe) and bananas. The most common food-related causes of severe anaphylactic reactions are peanuts, tree nuts such as walnuts, and shellfish. Type IV Type IV hypersensitivities usually involve the skin and are defined as "delayed" hypersensitivities since the reaction typically appears about 48-72 hours after exposure to an allergen. These reactions occur when an antigen interacts with specific sensitized T lymphocytes. The lymphocytes release inflammatory and toxic substances, which attract other white blood cells to the exposure site, resulting in tissue injury. No immune system "priming" is necessary; people can have a type IV reaction with the first exposure. A common example of this type of allergy is the reaction to poison ivy. What is not an allergy? There are other reactions that can cause allergy-like symptoms but are not caused by an activation of the immune system. They range from toxic reactions that affect anyone who has sufficient exposure, such as food poisoning caused by bacterial toxins, to genetic conditions, such as intolerances caused by the lack of an enzyme (for example, the inability to digest milk sugar, resulting in lactose intolerance, and sensitivities to things like gluten in Celiac disease). Symptoms can also be caused by medications such as aspirin and ampicillin, food dyes, MSG (monosodium glutamate, a food flavor additive), and by some psychological triggers. While these diseases and conditions may need to be investigated by a health practitioner, they are not allergies and will not be identified during allergy testing.

Allergy, Modified Skin Prick

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Allergy, Modified Skin Prick Direct Patient 1200 7 Days

The gold standard for allergy testing is as simple as pricking your skin, inserting a small amount of a substance, and waiting to see what happens. If you’re allergic to the substance, a reddish, elevated bump with a red ring around it will appear. This bump may be severely itchy.

What is an allergen?

An allergen is any substance that elicits an allergic reaction. When an allergen is inserted under a layer of your skin in a skin prick test, your immune system kicks into overdrive. It sends out antibodies to defend against what it believes to be a harmful substance. When the allergen binds to a specific type of antibody, this triggers the release of chemicals, such as histamine. Histamine contributes to an allergic reaction. During this reaction, certain things happen in your body:
  • Your blood vessels widen and become more porous.
  • Fluid escapes from your blood vessels, which causes redness and swelling.
  • Your body produces more mucus, which leads to congestion, runny nose, and teary eyes.
  • Your nerve endings are stimulated, which causes itching, rash, or hives.
  • Your stomach produces more acid.
In more severe cases, two other things may happen:
  • Your blood pressure drops because of widened blood vessels.
  • Your airways swell and your bronchial tubes constrict, making it hard to breathe.

ALP ( Alkaline phosphatase)

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ALP ( Alkaline phosphatase) Total Serum 150 same day

An alkaline phosphatase level test (ALP test) measures the amount of alkaline phosphatase enzyme in your bloodstream. The test requires a simple blood draw and is often a routine part of other blood tests. Abnormal levels of ALP in your blood most often indicate a problem with your liver, gallbladder, or bones. However, they may also indicate malnutrition, kidney cancer tumors, intestinal issues, a pancreas problem, or a serious infection. The normal range of ALP varies from person to person and depends on your age, blood type, gender, and whether you’re pregnant. According to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), the normal range for serum ALP level is 20–140 IU/L, but this can vary from laboratory to laboratory. The normal range runs higher in children and decreases with age. The best way to know what is normal or not is to discuss the results with your doctor, who will be able to interpret the lab’s specific result and reference ranges.

What is alkaline phosphatase?

Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in your bloodstream. ALP helps break down proteins in the body and exists in different forms, depending on where it originates. Your liver is one of the main sources of ALP, but some is also made in your bones, intestines, pancreas, and kidneys. In pregnant women, ALP is made in the placenta.

Why take an alkaline phosphatase level test?

An ALP test may be performed to determine how well your liver and gallbladder are functioning or to identify problems with your bones.

Liver and gallbladder

Checking levels in the blood is a routine part of liver function and gallbladder tests. Symptoms such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting may lead your doctor to suspect there is something wrong with your liver or gallbladder.

The test can be helpful in identifying conditions such as:

  • hepatitis (inflammation of the liver that could be due to an infectious or noninfectious cause)
  • cirrhosis (scarring of the liver)
  • cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder)
  • blockage of bile ducts (from a gallstone, inflammation, or cancer)
You may also need an ALP test if you’re taking a medication that has the potential to damage your liver, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol). Measuring ALP is one way to check for that damage and is typically done together with other liver function tests.

Bones

The ALP test can be helpful in the diagnosis of bone problems such as:
  • rickets: a weakening or softening of the bones in children that’s most commonly due to a significant deficiency of vitamin D or calcium
  • osteomalacia: a softening of the bones in adults usually due to significant vitamin D deficiency, but also possibly due to the body’s inability to process and utilize vitamin D properly
  • Paget’s disease of the bone: a disorder causing major problems with bone destruction and regrowth
ALP testing may also be helpful in investigating the presence of cancer tumors, unusual bone growth, or vitamin D deficiency. It can also be used to check the progress of treatment for any of the above conditions.

Alpha Amylase

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Alpha Amylase serum/body/fluid 350 same day

Alpha Amylase is an enzyme, or special protein, produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The pancreas is an organ located behind your stomach. It creates various enzymes that help break down food in your intestines. The pancreas can sometimes become damaged or inflamed, which causes it to produce too much or too little Alpha Amylase. An abnormal amount of amylase in your body may be a sign of a pancreatic disorder. An amylase blood test can determine whether you have a disease of the pancreas by measuring the amount of amylase in your body. You may have a disorder affecting the pancreas if your levels of amylase are too low or too high.

Why is an Alpha Amylase blood test done?

Amylase is typically measured by testing a sample of your blood. In some cases, a urine sample may also be used to determine the amount of amylase in your body. An amylase blood test is usually done if your doctor suspects pancreatitis, which is inflammation of the pancreas. Amylase levels can also rise due to other pancreatic disorders, such as:
  • pancreatic pseudocyst
  • pancreatic abscess
  • pancreatic cancer

Symptoms vary for the different diseases, but they may include:

  • upper abdominal pain
  • loss of appetite
  • fever
  • nausea and vomiting

How do I prepare for an Alpha Amylase blood test?

You should avoid drinking alcohol before the test. You should also tell your doctor about any medications you may be taking. Certain drugs can affect your test results. Your doctor may tell you to stop taking a particular medication or to change the dose temporarily. Some medications that can affect the amount of amylase in your blood include:
  • asparaginase
  • aspirin
  • birth control pills
  • cholinergic medications
  • ethacrynic acid
  • methyldopa
  • opiates, such as codeine, meperidine, and morphine
  • thiazide diuretics, such as chlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone

Alpha Amylase pancreatic

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Alpha Amylase pancreatic serum 400 same day

What’s an amylase blood test?
Amylase is an enzyme, or special protein, produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The pancreas is an organ located behind your stomach. It creates various enzymes that help break down food in your intestines. The pancreas can sometimes become damaged or inflamed, which causes it to produce too much or too little amylase. An abnormal amount of amylase in your body may be a sign of a pancreatic disorder. An amylase blood test can determine whether you have a disease of the pancreas by measuring the amount of amylase in your body. You may have a disorder affecting the pancreas if your levels of amylase are too low or too high.
Why is an amylase blood test done?
Amylase is typically measured by testing a sample of your blood. In some cases, a urine sample may also be used to determine the amount of amylase in your body. An blood test is usually done if your doctor suspects pancreatitis, which is inflammation of the pancreas. Amylase levels can also rise due to other pancreatic disorders, such as:
  • pancreatic pseudocyst
  • pancreatic abscess
  • pancreatic cancer
Symptoms vary for the different diseases, but they may include:
  • upper abdominal pain
  • loss of appetite
  • fever
  • nausea and vomiting
How do I prepare for an amylase blood test?
You should avoid drinking alcohol before the test. You should also tell your doctor about any medications you may be taking. Certain drugs can affect your test results. Your doctor may tell you to stop taking a particular medication or to change the dose temporarily. Some medications that can affect the amount of amylase in your blood include:
  • asparaginase
  • aspirin
  • birth control pills
  • cholinergic medications
  • ethacrynic acid
  • methyldopa
  • opiates, such as codeine, meperidine, and morphine
  • thiazide diuretics, such as chlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone
What can I expect during an amylase blood test?
The procedure involves taking a sample of blood through a vein, usually in your arm. This process only takes a few minutes:
  1. The healthcare provider will apply an antiseptic to the area where your blood will be drawn.
  2. An elastic band will be tied around your upper arm to increase the amount of blood flow to the veins, causing them to swell. This makes it easier to find a vein.
  3. Then, a needle will be inserted into your vein. After the vein is punctured, the blood will flow through the needle into a small tube that’s attached to it. You may feel a slight prick when the needle goes in, but the test itself isn’t painful.
  4. Once enough blood is collected, the needle will be removed and a sterile bandage will be applied over the puncture site.
  5. Collected blood is then sent to a lab for testing.
What do the results mean?
Laboratories can differ in what they consider to be a normal amount of amylase in the blood. Some labs define a normal amount to be 23 to 85 units per liter (U/L), while others consider 40 to 140 U/L to be normal. Make sure you speak with your doctor about your results and what they could mean. Abnormal results can happen for a number of reasons. The underlying cause depends on whether the level of amylase in your blood is too high or too low.
 

Acute or chronic pancreatitis

Acute or chronic pancreatitis occurs when the enzymes that help break down food in the intestines start breaking down the tissues of the pancreas instead. Acute pancreatitis comes on suddenly but doesn’t last very long. Chronic pancreatitis, however, lasts longer and will flare up from time to time.

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder usually caused by gallstones. Gallstones are hard deposits of digestive fluid that form in the gallbladder and cause blockages. Cholecystitis can sometimes be caused by tumors. Amylase levels will be elevated if the pancreatic duct that allows amylase to enter the small bowel is blocked by a gallstone or inflammation in the area.

Macroamylasemia

Macroamylasemia develops when macroamylase is present in the blood. Macroamylase is amylase attached to a protein.

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps. It can be caused by bacteria or a virus.

Peptic ulcers or a perforated ulcer

A peptic ulcer is a condition where the lining of the stomach or intestine becomes inflamed, causing ulcers, or sores, to develop. When ulcers extend all the way through the tissue of the stomach or intestine, it’s called a perforation. This condition is considered a medical emergency.

Tubal, or ectopic pregnancy

Fallopian tubes connect your ovaries to your uterus. A tubal pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg, or embryo, is in one of your fallopian tubes instead of in your uterus. This is also called an ectopic pregnancy, which is a pregnancy that takes place outside of the uterus. Other conditions can also cause elevated amylase counts, including vomiting from any cause, heavy alcohol use, salivary gland infections, and intestinal blockages.
 

Ammonia

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Ammonia EDTA Blood/24 hr. Urine 340 4 Days

Ammonia is a waste product formed primarily by bacteria in the intestines during the digestion of protein. If not processed and cleared from the body appropriately, excess NH4 can accumulate in the blood. This test measures the amount of NH4 in the blood. NH4 is normally transported in the blood to the liver, where it is converted into two substances called urea and glutamine. The urea is then carried to the kidneys, where it is eliminated in the urine. If this "urea cycle" does not complete the breakdown of NH4 , NH4 builds up in the blood and can pass from the blood into the brain. NH4 is toxic to the brain. For example, when liver function is significantly reduced due to disorders such as cirrhosis or hepatitis, ammonia and other compounds processed by the liver can accumulate in the brain and cause a condition called hepatic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy causes mental and neurological changes that can lead to confusion, disorientation, sleepiness, and eventually to coma and even death. Infants and children with increased ammonia levels may vomit frequently, be irritable, and be increasingly lethargic. Left untreated, they may experience seizures, have difficulty breathing, and may lapse into a coma.

Problems with ammonia processing can arise from conditions such as:

  • Severe liver disease – damage limits the ability of the liver to process ammonia; spikes in ammonia blood levels may be seen in people with stable liver disease, especially following a triggering event such as gastrointestinal bleeding or an electrolyte imbalance.
  • Decreased blood flow to the liver – ammonia is less able to get to the liver to be processed.
  • Reye syndrome – a rare condition that affects the blood, brain, and liver; it is characterized by a rise in ammonia levels and a fall in glucose. It affects primarily children and young adults. In most cases, it follows and appears to be triggered by a viral infection, such as the flu or chickenpox. Children who are given aspirin are at an increased risk.
  • Renal failure – the kidneys are unable to effectively rid the body of urea, leading to a build-up of ammonia in the blood.
  • Rare inherited defects in the urea cycle – a deficiency or defect in one or more of the enzymes necessary to complete the conversion of ammonia to urea.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample? Avoid smoking cigarettes prior to collection of the specimen and follow any other instructions you are given.

Amylase

Scientific Name Specimen Price( Rs ) ReportDelivery
Amylase serum 250 same day

What’s an amylase blood test?
Amylase is an enzyme, or special protein, produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The pancreas is an organ located behind your stomach. It creates various enzymes that help break down food in your intestines. The pancreas can sometimes become damaged or inflamed, which causes it to produce too much or too little amylase. An abnormal amount of amylase in your body may be a sign of a pancreatic disorder. A blood test can determine whether you have a disease of the pancreas by measuring the amount of amylase in your body. You may have a disorder affecting the pancreas if your levels of amylase are too low or too high.
Why is an amylase blood test done?
is typically measured by testing a sample of your blood. In some cases, a urine sample may also be used to determine the amount of amylase in your body. An amylase blood test is usually done if your doctor suspects pancreatitis, which is inflammation of the pancreas. Amylase levels can also rise due to other pancreatic disorders, such as:
  • pancreatic pseudocyst
  • pancreatic abscess
  • pancreatic cancer
Symptoms vary for the different diseases, but they may include:
  • upper abdominal pain
  • loss of appetite
  • fever
  • nausea and vomiting
How do I prepare for an amylase blood test?
You should avoid drinking alcohol before the test. You should also tell your doctor about any medications you may be taking. Certain drugs can affect your test results. Your doctor may tell you to stop taking a particular medication or to change the dose temporarily. Some medications that can affect the amount of amylase in your blood include:
  • asparaginase
  • aspirin
  • birth control pills
  • cholinergic medications
  • ethacrynic acid
  • methyldopa
  • opiates, such as codeine, meperidine, and morphine
  • thiazide diuretics, such as chlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone
What can I expect during an amylase blood test?
The procedure involves taking a sample of blood through a vein, usually in your arm. This process only takes a few minutes:
  1. The healthcare provider will apply an antiseptic to the area where your blood will be drawn.
  2. An elastic band will be tied around your upper arm to increase the amount of blood flow to the veins, causing them to swell. This makes it easier to find a vein.
  3. Then, a needle will be inserted into your vein. After the vein is punctured, the blood will flow through the needle into a small tube that’s attached to it. You may feel a slight prick when the needle goes in, but the test itself isn’t painful.
  4. Once enough blood is collected, the needle will be removed and a sterile bandage will be applied over the puncture site.
  5. Collected blood is then sent to a lab for testing.
What do the results mean?
Laboratories can differ in what they consider to be a normal amount of amylase in the blood. Some labs define a normal amount to be 23 to 85 units per liter (U/L), while others consider 40 to 140 U/L to be normal. Make sure you speak with your doctor about your results and what they could mean. Abnormal results can happen for a number of reasons. The underlying cause depends on whether the level of amylase in your blood is too high or too low.
High amylase
A high amylase count may be a sign of the following conditions:

Acute or chronic pancreatitis

Acute or chronic pancreatitis occurs when the enzymes that help break down food in the intestines start breaking down the tissues of the pancreas instead. Acute pancreatitis comes on suddenly but doesn’t last very long. Chronic pancreatitis, however, lasts longer and will flare up from time to time.

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder usually caused by gallstones. Gallstones are hard deposits of digestive fluid that form in the gallbladder and cause blockages. Cholecystitis can sometimes be caused by tumors. Amylase levels will be elevated if the pancreatic duct that allows amylase to enter the small bowel is blocked by a gallstone or inflammation in the area.

Macroamylasemia

Macroamylasemia develops when macroamylase is present in the blood. Macroamylase is amylase attached to a protein.

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps. It can be caused by bacteria or a virus.

Peptic ulcers or a perforated ulcer

A peptic ulcer is a condition where the lining of the stomach or intestine becomes inflamed, causing ulcers, or sores, to develop. When ulcers extend all the way through the tissue of the stomach or intestine, it’s called a perforation. This condition is considered a medical emergency.

Tubal, or ectopic pregnancy

Fallopian tubes connect your ovaries to your uterus. A tubal pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg, or embryo, is in one of your fallopian tubes instead of in your uterus. This is also called an ectopic pregnancy, which is a pregnancy that takes place outside of the uterus. Other conditions can also cause elevated amylase counts, including vomiting from any cause, heavy alcohol use, salivary gland infections, and intestinal blockages.

Amylases/Diastase

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Amylase/Diastase Random Urine 650 4 Days

The organ in your belly that helps you digest food -- she may do an amylases test. Amylases is a protein made by your pancreas and by glands in and around your mouth and throat. It helps you break down carbohydrates and starches into sugar.It’s normal to have some amylases in your blood. But too much of it could mean one of the ducts (tubes) in your pancreas is blocked or injured.

Symptoms of this may include:

  • Belly pain -- usually around your navel -- that doesn’t go away
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea

Why Do I Need This Test?

In nearly all cases, your doctor will order an amylase test at the same time he orders a lipase test. Lipase is a chemical your pancreas makes to help your body digest fats. Together, these tests can tell your doctor if you have a disease of the pancreas, such as pancreatitis, which means your pancreas is inflamed. He might also order an amylases test if he suspects there’s a blockage in the duct that carries digestive enzymes to your small intestine. This may be due to pancreatic cancer, gallstones, or a narrowing of the duct or the sphincter that separates the pancreatic duct from the bowel. The amylases test is also used to check on people with cystic fibrosis (CF). That’s a disease that causes lung infections. It can also make it hard for your body to absorb nutrients from food. If you have CF, high amylase levels can mean that you have thick mucus plugs that are blocking digestive enzymes from moving from your pancreas to your small intestine.

Anti CCP

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Anti CCP serum 1400 7 Days

Cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies are autoantibodies produced by the immune system that are directed against cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP). This test detects and measures anti-CCP antibodies in the blood. Citrulline is naturally produced in the body as part of the metabolism of the amino acid arginine. However, in joints with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), this conversion may occur at a higher rate. Citrulline changes the protein structure and can trigger an immune response, producing autoantibodies against joint proteins. The CCP antibody test helps to diagnose RA and can be useful in identifying people with a more rapidly erosive form of the disease. RA is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation, pain, stiffness, and destructive changes in the hands, feet, and other joints throughout the body. It can affect anyone at any age, but it usually develops between the ages of 40 and 60, and about 75% of those affected are women. The course of RA and its prognosis are variable. It may develop and progress slowly or rapidly. It may go into remission in some people and, in a few, it may go away. Left untreated, RA can shorten a person's lifespan and can, within a few years, leave many of those affected too disabled to work. There are a variety of treatments available to minimize the complications of RA, but they depend on making an accurate diagnosis and on beginning treatment before the development of significant joint damage. Rheumatoid factor (RF) has been the primary blood test used to detect RA and distinguish it from other types of arthritis and other inflammatory processes. However, the sensitivity and specificity of RF are not ideal; it can be negative in people who have clinical signs of RA and positive in people who do not. Studies have shown that the CCP antibody test has a sensitivity and specificity that is equal to or better than RF and is more likely to be positive with early RA. The 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria from the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) includes CCP antibody testing, along with RF, as part of its criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis. According to the ACR, CCP antibodies may be detected in about 50-60% of people with early RA, as early as 3-6 months after the beginning of symptoms. Early detection and diagnosis of RA allows healthcare providers to begin aggressive treatment of the condition, minimizing the associated complications and tissue damage.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Anti HCV

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Anti HCV serum 650 Next day

Hepatitis C (HCV) is a virus that causes an infection of the liver that is characterized by liver inflammation and damage. Hepatitis C tests are a group of tests that are performed to detect, diagnose, and monitor the treatment of a hepatitis C viral infection. The most common test for HCV looks for antibodies in the blood that are produced in response to an HCV infection. Other tests detect the presence of viral RNA, the amount of viral RNA present, or determine the specific subtype of the virus. Hepatitis C is one of five hepatitis viruses identified so far, including A, B, D, and E, that are known to cause the disease. HCV is spread by exposure to contaminated blood, primarily though the sharing of needles by intravenous drug users, but also by sharing personal items contaminated by blood such as razors, through sex with an infected person, via healthcare occupational exposure, and, less commonly, from mother to baby during childbirth. Before tests for HCV became available in the 1990s, HCV was often transmitted by blood transfusions. While HCV is not as contagious as hepatitis B, there is currently no vaccine to prevent infection. Hepatitis C infection is a common cause of chronic liver disease in North America. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that there were approximately 30,500 cases of acute hepatitis C in the U.S. in 2014 and that there are 2.7 to 3.9 million people in the U.S. living with chronic hepatitis C. Many of those who are infected have no symptoms and are not aware of the condition. The acute HCV infection may cause few to mild nonspecific symptoms, and the chronic infection may simmer quietly for a decade or two before causing sufficient liver damage to affect liver function. Hepatitis C infections cause increased risk of developing some other serious conditions:

  • About 75-85% will develop chronic HCV infection.
  • About 5-20% will develop cirrhosis over 20 years; recent projections suggest that almost 45% will eventually develop cirrhosis.
  • HCV causes death in about 1-5% of those chronically infected who develop cirrhosis or liver cancer.
Hepatitis C antibody tests are used to screen individuals for the infection, including, for example, people with no signs or symptoms but with risk factors, people who have symptoms associated with hepatitis or liver disease, or those who have been exposed to the virus. Since the antibody test can remain positive in most people even if they have cleared the infection, a positive antibody test is followed by a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects genetic material of the virus. A positive result on the RNA test means the virus is present, the infection has not resolved, and the person may require treatment. The hepatitis C genotype test determines which strain of virus is present to help guide treatment. Healthcare practitioners may also order a liver panel, which is a group of tests that help assess the health of the liver.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is drawn by needle from a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Antinuclear Antibody/Faehr) ANA/ANF

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Anti Nuclear Antibody/Faehr) ANA/ANF serum 900 same day

What are antinuclear antibodies?

We normally have antibodies in our blood that repel invaders in our bodies, such as virus and bacteria microbes. Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are unusual antibodies, detectable in the blood, that have the capability of binding to certain structures within the nucleus of the cells. The nucleus is the innermost core within the body's cells and contains the DNA, the primary genetic material. ANAs are found in patients whose immune system may be predisposed to cause inflammation against their own body tissues. Antibodies that are directed against one's own tissues are referred to as autoantibodies. The propensity for the immune system to work against its own body is referred to as autoimmunity. ANAs suggest the possible presence of autoimmunity. Therefore, when they are detected in a patient's blood (referred to as a "positive" result), doctors will consider the possibility that an autoimmune illness exists in that patient.
Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are a group of antibodies produced by a person's immune system when it fails to adequately distinguish between "self" and "nonself." These antibodies, known as autoantibodies, attack the body's own healthy cells and cause signs and symptoms such as tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle pain, and fatigue. ANA specifically target substances found in the nucleus of a cell, hence the name "antinuclear." The ANA test identifies the presence of these autoantibodies in the blood. The presence of ANA may be a marker of an autoimmune process and is associated with several autoimmune disorders but is most commonly seen with the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The ANA test is one of the primary tests for helping to diagnose a suspected autoimmune disorder or ruling out other conditions with similar signs and symptoms. As such, it is often followed by other tests for autoantibodies that may help to establish a diagnosis. These may include, for example, an ENA panel, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere and/or anti-histone test.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is taken by needle from a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

APO A1(Apolipoproline A-1)

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APO A1(Apolipoproline A1) serum 600 5 Days

Apolipoproline A-1 (apo A-I) is a protein that has a specific role in the metabolism of lipids and is the main protein component in high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the "good cholesterol"). This test measures the amount of apo A-I in the blood. Apolipoproline A-1 combine with lipids to transport them throughout the bloodstream. Apolipoproline A-1 provide structural integrity to lipoproteins and shield the water-repellent (hydrophobic) lipids at their center. Most lipoproteins are cholesterol- or triglyceride-rich and carry lipids throughout the body for uptake by cells. HDL, however, is like an empty taxi. It goes out to the tissues and picks up excess cholesterol, then transports it back to the liver. In the liver, the cholesterol is either recycled for future use or excreted into bile. HDL's reverse transport is the only way that cells can get rid of excess cholesterol. It helps protect the arteries and, if there is enough HDL present, it can even reverse the build-up of fatty plaques, deposits resulting from atherosclerosis that can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Apolipoproline A-1 A is the taxi driver. It activates the enzymes that load cholesterol from the tissues into HDL and allows HDL to be recognized and bound by receptors in the liver at the end of the transport. There are two forms of apolipoprotein A: apo A-I and apo A-II. Apo A-I is found in greater proportion than apo A-II (about 3 to 1). The concentration of apo A-I can be measured directly and tends to rise and fall with HDL levels. Deficiencies in apo A-I correlate with an increased risk of developing CVD.

How is the sample collected for Apolipoproline A-1 testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. As an alternative, particularly in pediatric care, the blood sample is obtained by pricking the heel or fingertip.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed; however, since this test may be performed at the same time as a complete lipid profile, fasting for at least 12 hours may be required.

APO B (Apolipotrotine B)

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APO B (Apolipotrotine B) serum 600 same day

Apolipoprotein B-100 (also called apolipoprotein B or apo B) is a protein that is involved in the metabolism of lipids and is the main protein constituent of lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the "bad cholesterol"). This test measures the amount of apo B in the blood. Apolipoproteins combine with lipids to transport them throughout the bloodstream. Apolipoproteins provide structural integrity to lipoproteins and shield the water-repellent (hydrophobic) lipids at their center. Most lipoproteins are cholesterol- or triglyceride-rich and carry lipids through the body for uptake by cells. Chylomicrons are the lipoprotein particles that carry dietary lipids from the digestive tract, via the bloodstream, to tissue – mainly the liver. In the liver, the body repackages these dietary lipids and combines them with apo B-100 to form triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combination is like a taxi full of passengers with apo B-100 as the taxi driver. In the bloodstream, the taxi moves from place to place, releasing one passenger at a time. An enzyme called lipoprotein lipase (LPL) removes triglycerides from VLDL to produce intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) first and then LDL. Each VLDL particle contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is retained as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the more cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is recognized by receptors found on the surface of many of the body's cells. These receptors promote the uptake of cholesterol into the cells. The cholesterol that LDL and apo B-100 transport is vital for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone production, and steroid production. In excess, however, LDL can lead to fatty deposits (plaques) in artery walls and lead to hardening and scarring of the blood vessels. These fatty depositions narrow the vessels in a process termed atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic process increases the risk of heart attack. Apo B-100 levels tend to mirror LDL-C levels, a test routinely ordered as part of a lipid profile. Many experts think that apo B levels may eventually prove to be a better indicator of risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than LDL-C. Others disagree; they feel that apo B is only a marginally better alternative and do not recommend its routine use. The clinical utility of apo B and that of other emerging cardiac risk markers such as apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP has yet to be fully established.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No special preparation is needed for an apo B test. However, since this test is often ordered at the same time as other tests that do require fasting, such as LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides, fasting for at least 12 hours may be required.

APTT

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APTT plasma cit 300 Next day

A partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test is a blood test that helps doctors assess your body’s ability to form blood clots. Bleeding triggers a series of reactions known as the coagulation cascade. Coagulation is the process your body uses to stop bleeding. Cells called platelets create a plug to cover the damaged tissue. Then your body’s clotting factors interact to form a blood clot. Low levels of clotting factors can prevent a clot from forming. A deficiency in clotting factors can lead to symptoms such as excessive bleeding, persistent nosebleeds, and easy bruising. To test your body’s blood clotting abilities, your doctor collects a sample of your blood in a vial and adds chemicals that will make your blood clot. The test measures how many seconds it takes for a clot to form. This test is sometimes called an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test.

Why do I need a APTT test?

Your doctor may order a APTT test to investigate the cause of prolonged or excessive bleeding. Symptoms that may prompt your doctor to order this test include:
  • frequent or heavy nosebleeds
  • heavy or prolonged menstrual periods
  • blood in the urine
  • swollen and painful joints (caused by bleeding into your joint spaces)
  • easy bruising
The PTT test can’t diagnose a specific condition. But it does helps your doctor learn whether your blood clotting factors are deficient. If your test results are abnormal, your doctor will probably need to order more tests to see which factor your body isn’t producing. Your doctor might also use this test to monitor your condition when you take the blood thinner heparin.

ASO Titre

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ASO Titre serum 250 same day

The antistreptolysin O (ASO) titer test is a blood test that checks for a strep infection. When you come into contact with harmful bacteria, your body produces antibodies to defend itself against these bacteria. Your body produces antibodies specific to the bacteria they fight. The ASO titer test measures antibodies produced by your body in response to a toxin known as streptolysin O. Streptolysin O is a toxin produced by group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria. Your body makes the antistreptolysin O antibodies when you have a strep infection caused by GAS bacteria. Usually, when you have a strep infection like strep throat, you receive antibiotics that kill the strep bacteria. But some people don’t have any symptoms during a strep infection and may not know they need treatment. When this happens, an untreated infection can lead to future complications. These complications are known as post-streptococcal complications. The ASO titer test can help your doctor determine if you recently had a strep infection by measuring the presence of antistreptolysin antibodies in your blood.

Why do I need an ASO titer test?

Your doctor will order the ASO titer test if you have symptoms of post-streptococcal complications. Some of the common complications of strep include:
  • bacterial endocarditis
  • glomerulonephritis
  • rheumatic fever
The antistreptolysin antibodies peak in your system between three to eight weeks after a strep infection. Levels can remain high for several months. Your doctor can determine if your symptoms are due to a post-streptococcal complication by checking your antibody levels.

ASO Titre

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ASO Titre serum 250 same day

The antistreptolysin O (ASO) titer test is a blood test that checks for a strep infection. When you come into contact with harmful bacteria, your body produces antibodies to defend itself against these bacteria. Your body produces antibodies specific to the bacteria they fight. The ASO titer test measures antibodies produced by your body in response to a toxin known as streptolysin O. Streptolysin O is a toxin produced by group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria. Your body makes the antistreptolysin O antibodies when you have a strep infection caused by GAS bacteria. Usually, when you have a strep infection like strep throat, you receive antibiotics that kill the strep bacteria. But some people don’t have any symptoms during a strep infection and may not know they need treatment. When this happens, an untreated infection can lead to future complications. These complications are known as post-streptococcal complications. The ASO titer test can help your doctor determine if you recently had a strep infection by measuring the presence of antistreptolysin antibodies in your blood.

Why do I need an ASO titer test?

Your doctor will order the ASO titer test if you have symptoms of post-streptococcal complications. Some of the common complications of strep include:
  • bacterial endocarditis
  • glomerulonephritis
  • rheumatic fever
The antistreptolysin antibodies peak in your system between three to eight weeks after a strep infection. Levels can remain high for several months. Your doctor can determine if your symptoms are due to a post-streptococcal complication by checking your antibody levels.

ASO(Anti streptocyrim-o) Quantitative

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ASO(Anti streptocyrim-o) Quantitative serum 250 same day

Antistreptolysin O (ASO) is an antibody targeted against streptolysin O, a toxic enzyme produced by group A Streptococcus bacteria. ASO and anti-DNase B are the most common of several antibodies that are produced by the body's immune system in response to a strep infection with group A Streptococcus. This test measures the amount of ASO in the blood. Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) is the bacterium responsible for causing strep throat and a variety of other infections, including skin infections (pyoderma, impetigo, cellulitis). In most cases, strep infections are identified and treated with antibiotics, and the infections resolve. When a strep infection does not cause identifiable symptoms, goes untreated, or is treated ineffectively, however, complications (sequelae), namely rheumatic fever and a type of kidney disease (glomerulonephritis), can sometimes develop, especially in young children. These secondary conditions have become much less prevalent in the U.S. because of routine strep testing, but they still do occur. These conditions can cause serious complications such as damage the heart, acute kidney dysfunction, tissue swelling (edema), and high blood pressure (hypertension). The ASO test can be used to help determine if these are due to a recent group A strep infection.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Bence Jones Protein

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Bens Jens Protein Serum 30 Same day

The Bence Jones protein (BJP) test measures the level of BJP in your urine. Bence Jones proteins are named for Henry Bence Jones, a physician and chemist who first isolated them in 1847. These proteins are not present in healthy urine samples and are usually a sign of multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a type of bone marrow cancer that is most common in people who are older than 60 years. Your bone marrow is found in the center of your larger bones. It makes red and white blood cells as well as platelets. Multiple myeloma is a condition where your bone marrow makes too much of a type of white blood cell. Normally, white blood cells make many different types of antibodies. They play an important role in your immune system. However, when you have multiple myeloma, one white blood cell line grows out of control. It produces only one type of antibody. These cells then crowd out the normal cells, which makes you vulnerable to illness.

The importance of the Bence Jones test

People who have multiple myeloma can go without symptoms for many years. Once symptoms do appear, they may seem to indicate other conditions. Therefore, tests such as the BJP test are necessary to diagnose multiple myeloma.

Symptoms of multiple myeloma

Symptoms of multiple myeloma are caused by the overgrowth of white blood cells. Myeloma cells take over your bones from the inside out. This makes your bones more likely to break. If you break a bone while performing an everyday task, your doctor might suspect multiple myeloma.

Other symptoms include:

  • kidney problems (caused by antibody buildup)
  • anemia, which causes fatigue or weakness
  • swollen or weak legs
  • pain in the ribs or back
  • compressed spinal cord or nerves (due to bone fractures)
  • excessive thirst
  • dehydration
  • frequent urination or constipation (from when bones break down and leave excess calcium in the blood)
  • confusion
  • recurring infections
  • excessive bleeding, even from slight injuries
A combination of these symptoms might signal your doctor to give you a BJP test.

Beta HCG

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Beta HCG Urine 750 Same day

The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) blood test measures the level of hormone present in a sample of your blood. is produced during pregnancy. Your doctor may refer to the blood test by another name, such as the:
  • beta-hCG blood test
  • quantitative blood pregnancy test
  • quantitative blood test
  • quantitative serial beta-test
  • repeat quantitative beta-test
There are important differences between blood tests and the urine tests that you can purchase over the counter. Urine tests can be influenced by factors such as dehydration and the time of day that you test, while an  blood test can provide conclusive results even in cases where levels are quite low.

What is human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)?

During pregnancy, cells in the developing placenta make . The placenta is the sac that nourishes the egg after it’s fertilized and attaches to the uterine wall. HCG can first be detected in a blood sample about 11 days after conception. Levels of continue to double every 48 to 72 hours. They reach their peak around 8 to 11 weeks after conception. levels then decline and level off, remaining steady for the rest of the pregnancy.

Why is the hCG blood test performed?

The blood test is performed to:
  • confirm pregnancy
  • determine the approximate age of the fetus
  • diagnose an abnormal pregnancy, such as an ectopic pregnancy
  • diagnose a potential miscarriage
  • screen for Down syndrome
The blood test is sometimes used to screen for pregnancy before a woman undergoes certain medical treatments that could potentially harm a developing baby. Examples of these treatments include X-rays. If an test concludes that a woman is pregnant, healthcare professionals can ensure that she’s protected and that the fetus isn’t harmed by those medical treatments.

Bilirubin (Total)

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Biluribin Serum 100 Same day

Bilirubin is a yellow pigment that’s in everyone’s blood and stool. Sometimes the liver can’t process the bilirubin in the body. This can be due to an excess of bilirubin, an obstruction, or inflammation of the liver. When your body has too much bilirubin, your skin and the whites of your eyes will start to yellow. This condition is called jaundice. A bilirubin test will help determine if you have any of these conditions. Bilirubins is made in the body when the hemoglobin protein in old red blood cells is broken down. The breakdown of old cells is a normal, healthy process. After circulating in your blood, bilirubins then travels to your liver. In the liver, bilirubins is conjugated, mixed into bile, and then excreted into the bile ducts and stored in your gallbladder. Eventually, the bile is released into the small intestine to help digest fats. It’s ultimately excreted within your stool. Bilirubins attached by the liver to the glucose-derived acid, glucuronic acid, is called direct, or conjugated, bilirubin. Bilirubins not attached to glucuronic acid is called indirect, or unconjugated, bilirubin. All the bilirubins in your blood together is called total bilirubin. A comprehensive bilirubins blood test will get an accurate count of all three bilirubins levels in your blood: direct, indirect, and total. In both adults and children, symptoms related to high bilirubins can involve jaundice, a yellowing of the skin or eyes, fatigue, itchy skin, dark urine, and low appetite.

Common reasons to test for bilirubin

If bilirubins is not being attached to the glucose-derived acid (conjugated) in the liver or is not being adequately removed from the blood, it can mean that there is damage to your liver. Testing for bilirubins in the blood is therefore a good way of testing for liver damage. Mild jaundice in newborns can either be due to normal changes in the metabolism of bilirubin, or it can be the first sign of a medical problem. If the level at birth is too high, an infant’s blood may be tested several times in the first few days of their life to monitor liver function. Jaundice in a newborn can be very serious and life-threatening if left untreated. Another reason for high bilirubins levels could be that more red blood cells are being destroyed than normal. This is called hemolysis. Sometimes bilirubins is measured as part of a “panel” of tests. Often, the liver is evaluated with a group of tests that also include:
  • alanine transaminase
  • aspartate aminotransferase
  • alkaline phosphatase
  • albumin
  • total protein

How is the bilirubin blood test performed?

A small amount of your blood is needed to perform this test. The blood sample is obtained through venipuncture, where a needle is inserted into a vein through the skin in your arm or hand, and a small amount of blood is collected in a test tube.

Blood Culture (Rapid Method)

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Blood Culture Blood in Glucose Both 500 10 Days

A blood culture is a test that checks for foreign invaders like bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms in your blood. Having these pathogens in your bloodstream can be a sign of a blood infection, a condition known as bacteremia. A positive blood culture means that you have bacteria in your blood. This type of infection involves the blood that circulates within your entire body. Bacteria that start on your skin or in your lungs, urine, or gastrointestinal tract are common sources of blood infections. An infection can spread to your blood and become systemic if it’s severe or if your immune system isn’t able to keep it contained. A systemic infection is known as sepsis. The test for a blood culture involves a simple blood draw. A laboratory tests the blood sample and forwards the results to your doctor, who will use the findings to help determine what’s needed to treat any infection.

Purpose of a blood culture

Blood cultures are ordered when your doctor suspects you may have a blood infection. It’s important to test for blood infections because they can lead to serious complications. One such complication of a blood infection is sepsis. In sepsis, the pathogens that are causing the infection in your bloodstream interfere with your body’s normal defenses and prevent your immune system from working properly. The pathogens also produce toxins that can damage your organs. The results of the test can help your doctor determine which specific organism or bacteria is causing the blood infection and how best to combat it.

Symptoms of blood infection and sepsis

  • shaking chills
  • moderate or high fever
  • rapid breathing
  • increased heart rate or palpitations
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle aches
  • headache
Without treatment, a blood infection can progress to its most severe stage, sepsis. The symptoms of sepsis include those listed above, as well as signs of damaged organs. The following are additional symptoms of sepsis:
  • confusion
  • decreased urine
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • mottled skin
As the infection progresses, more serious complications of sepsis may develop. These can include:
  • inflammation throughout your body
  • formation of many tiny blood clots in your smallest blood vessels
  • a dangerous drop in blood pressure
  • failure of one of more organs

Blood infection risk factors

Blood cultures are done more frequently for those who are at a higher risk of developing a blood infection. You’re at a higher risk if you’ve been diagnosed with:
  • diabetes
  • HIV or AIDS
  • cancer
  • an autoimmune disease
The following situations also put you at risk for blood infection:
  • You’ve recently had an infection.
  • You’ve recently had a surgical procedure.
  • You’ve had a prosthetic heart valve replacement.
  • You’re undergoing immunosuppressive therapy.
Blood cultures are also drawn more frequently in newborns and children with fever who may have an infection but don’t have the typical signs and symptoms of sepsis. Older adults are also at higher risk for blood infections.

Blood culture for other conditions

A blood culture can also be used to detect conditions such as endocarditis. Endocarditis is a condition that occurs when bacteria in your bloodstream sticks to your heart valves. It can be life-threatening.

Blood Culture (Rapid Method)

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Blood Culture Blood in Glucose Both 500 10 Days

A blood culture is a test that checks for foreign invaders like bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms in your blood. Having these pathogens in your bloodstream can be a sign of a blood infection, a condition known as bacteremia. A positive blood culture means that you have bacteria in your blood. This type of infection involves the blood that circulates within your entire body. Bacteria that start on your skin or in your lungs, urine, or gastrointestinal tract are common sources of blood infections. An infection can spread to your blood and become systemic if it’s severe or if your immune system isn’t able to keep it contained. A systemic infection is known as sepsis. The test for a blood culture involves a simple blood draw. A laboratory tests the blood sample and forwards the results to your doctor, who will use the findings to help determine what’s needed to treat any infection.

Purpose of a blood culture

Blood cultures are ordered when your doctor suspects you may have a blood infection. It’s important to test for blood infections because they can lead to serious complications. One such complication of a blood infection is sepsis. In sepsis, the pathogens that are causing the infection in your bloodstream interfere with your body’s normal defenses and prevent your immune system from working properly. The pathogens also produce toxins that can damage your organs. The results of the test can help your doctor determine which specific organism or bacteria is causing the blood infection and how best to combat it.

Symptoms of blood infection and sepsis

  • shaking chills
  • moderate or high fever
  • rapid breathing
  • increased heart rate or palpitations
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle aches
  • headache
Without treatment, a blood infection can progress to its most severe stage, sepsis. The symptoms of sepsis include those listed above, as well as signs of damaged organs. The following are additional symptoms of sepsis:
  • confusion
  • decreased urine
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • mottled skin
As the infection progresses, more serious complications of sepsis may develop. These can include:
  • inflammation throughout your body
  • formation of many tiny blood clots in your smallest blood vessels
  • a dangerous drop in blood pressure
  • failure of one of more organs

Blood infection risk factors

Blood cultures are done more frequently for those who are at a higher risk of developing a blood infection. You’re at a higher risk if you’ve been diagnosed with:
  • diabetes
  • HIV or AIDS
  • cancer
  • an autoimmune disease
The following situations also put you at risk for blood infection:
  • You’ve recently had an infection.
  • You’ve recently had a surgical procedure.
  • You’ve had a prosthetic heart valve replacement.
  • You’re undergoing immunosuppressive therapy.
Blood cultures are also drawn more frequently in newborns and children with fever who may have an infection but don’t have the typical signs and symptoms of sepsis. Older adults are also at higher risk for blood infections.

Blood culture for other conditions

A blood culture can also be used to detect conditions such as endocarditis. Endocarditis is a condition that occurs when bacteria in your bloodstream sticks to your heart valves. It can be life-threatening.

Blood culture & Sensitivity(Aerobic)

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Blood culture & Sensitivity Blood in Glucose Both 500 18 Days

A blood culture is a test that checks for foreign invaders like bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms in your blood. Having these pathogens in your bloodstream can be a sign of a blood infection, a condition known as bacteremia. A positive blood culture means that you have bacteria in your blood. This type of infection involves the blood that circulates within your entire body. Bacteria that start on your skin or in your lungs, urine, or gastrointestinal tract are common sources of blood infections. An infection can spread to your blood and become systemic if it’s severe or if your immune system isn’t able to keep it contained. A systemic infection is known as sepsis. The test for a blood culture involves a simple blood draw. A laboratory tests the blood sample and forwards the results to your doctor, who will use the findings to help determine what’s needed to treat any infection.

Purpose of a blood culture

Blood cultures are ordered when your doctor suspects you may have a blood infection. It’s important to test for blood infections because they can lead to serious complications. One such complication of a blood infection is sepsis. In sepsis, the pathogens that are causing the infection in your bloodstream interfere with your body’s normal defenses and prevent your immune system from working properly. The pathogens also produce toxins that can damage your organs. The results of the test can help your doctor determine which specific organism or bacteria is causing the blood infection and how best to combat it.

Symptoms of blood infection and sepsis

  • shaking chills
  • moderate or high fever
  • rapid breathing
  • increased heart rate or palpitations
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle aches
  • headache
Without treatment, a blood infection can progress to its most severe stage, sepsis. The symptoms of sepsis include those listed above, as well as signs of damaged organs. The following are additional symptoms of sepsis:
  • confusion
  • decreased urine
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • mottled skin
As the infection progresses, more serious complications of sepsis may develop. These can include:
  • inflammation throughout your body
  • formation of many tiny blood clots in your smallest blood vessels
  • a dangerous drop in blood pressure
  • failure of one of more organs

Blood infection risk factors

Blood cultures are done more frequently for those who are at a higher risk of developing a blood infection. You’re at a higher risk if you’ve been diagnosed with:
  • diabetes
  • HIV or AIDS
  • cancer
  • an autoimmune disease
The following situations also put you at risk for blood infection:
  • You’ve recently had an infection.
  • You’ve recently had a surgical procedure.
  • You’ve had a prosthetic heart valve replacement.
  • You’re undergoing immunosuppressive therapy.
Blood cultures are also drawn more frequently in newborns and children with fever who may have an infection but don’t have the typical signs and symptoms of sepsis. Older adults are also at higher risk for blood infections.

Blood culture for other conditions

A blood culture can also be used to detect conditions such as endocarditis. Endocarditis is a condition that occurs when bacteria in your bloodstream sticks to your heart valves. It can be life-threatening.

Blood culture & Sensitivity(Aerobic)

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Blood culture & Sensitivity Blood in Glucose Both 500 18 Days

A blood culture is a test that checks for foreign invaders like bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms in your blood. Having these pathogens in your bloodstream can be a sign of a blood infection, a condition known as bacteremia. A positive blood culture means that you have bacteria in your blood. This type of infection involves the blood that circulates within your entire body. Bacteria that start on your skin or in your lungs, urine, or gastrointestinal tract are common sources of blood infections. An infection can spread to your blood and become systemic if it’s severe or if your immune system isn’t able to keep it contained. A systemic infection is known as sepsis. The test for a blood culture involves a simple blood draw. A laboratory tests the blood sample and forwards the results to your doctor, who will use the findings to help determine what’s needed to treat any infection.

Purpose of a blood culture

Blood cultures are ordered when your doctor suspects you may have a blood infection. It’s important to test for blood infections because they can lead to serious complications. One such complication of a blood infection is sepsis. In sepsis, the pathogens that are causing the infection in your bloodstream interfere with your body’s normal defenses and prevent your immune system from working properly. The pathogens also produce toxins that can damage your organs. The results of the test can help your doctor determine which specific organism or bacteria is causing the blood infection and how best to combat it.

Symptoms of blood infection and sepsis

  • shaking chills
  • moderate or high fever
  • rapid breathing
  • increased heart rate or palpitations
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle aches
  • headache
Without treatment, a blood infection can progress to its most severe stage, sepsis. The symptoms of sepsis include those listed above, as well as signs of damaged organs. The following are additional symptoms of sepsis:
  • confusion
  • decreased urine
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • mottled skin
As the infection progresses, more serious complications of sepsis may develop. These can include:
  • inflammation throughout your body
  • formation of many tiny blood clots in your smallest blood vessels
  • a dangerous drop in blood pressure
  • failure of one of more organs

Blood infection risk factors

Blood cultures are done more frequently for those who are at a higher risk of developing a blood infection. You’re at a higher risk if you’ve been diagnosed with:
  • diabetes
  • HIV or AIDS
  • cancer
  • an autoimmune disease
The following situations also put you at risk for blood infection:
  • You’ve recently had an infection.
  • You’ve recently had a surgical procedure.
  • You’ve had a prosthetic heart valve replacement.
  • You’re undergoing immunosuppressive therapy.
Blood cultures are also drawn more frequently in newborns and children with fever who may have an infection but don’t have the typical signs and symptoms of sepsis. Older adults are also at higher risk for blood infections.

Blood culture for other conditions

A blood culture can also be used to detect conditions such as endocarditis. Endocarditis is a condition that occurs when bacteria in your bloodstream sticks to your heart valves. It can be life-threatening.

Blood Culture(Normal)

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Blood Culture(Normal) 500 Same day

Blood culture are procedures done to detect an infection in the blood and identify the cause. Infections of the bloodstream are most commonly caused by bacteria (bacteremia) but can also be caused by yeasts or other fungi (fungemia) or by a virus (viremia). Although blood can be used to test for viruses, this article focuses on the use of blood cultures to detect and identify bacteria and fungi in the blood. A blood infection typically originates from some other specific site within the body, spreading from that site when a person has a severe infection and/or the immune system cannot confine it to its source. For example, a urinary tract infection may spread from the bladder and/or kidneys into the blood and then be carried throughout the body, infecting other organs and causing a serious and sometimes life-threatening systemic infection. The terms septicemia and sepsis are sometimes used interchangeably to describe this condition. Septicemia refers to an infection of the blood while sepsis is the body's serious, overwhelming, and sometimes life-threatening response to infection. This condition often requires prompt and aggressive treatment, usually in an intensive care unit of a hospital. Other serious complications can result from an infection of the blood. Endocarditis, an inflammation and infection of the lining of the heart and/or of the heart valves, can result from a bloodstream infection. People who have prosthetic heart valves or prosthetic joints have a higher risk of a systemic infection following their surgery, although these infections are not common. Anyone with a weakened immune system due to an underlying disease, such as leukemia or HIV/AIDS, or due to immunosuppressive drugs such as those given for chemotherapy is at a higher risk for blood infections as their immune system is less capable of killing the microbes that occasionally enter the blood. Bacteria and yeasts may also be introduced directly into the bloodstream through intravenous drug use or through intravenous catheters or surgical drains. For blood cultures, multiple blood samples are usually collected for testing and from different veins to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria or fungi that may be present in small numbers and/or may enter the blood intermittently. This is also done to help ensure that any bacteria or fungi detected are the ones causing the infection and are not contaminants. Blood cultures are incubated for several days before being reported as negative. Some types of bacteria and fungi grow more slowly than others and/or may take longer to detect if initially present in low numbers. When a blood culture is positive, the specific microbe causing the infection is identified and susceptibility testing is performed to inform the healthcare practitioner which antibiotics are most likely to be effective for treatment. In many laboratories, the blood culture testing process is automated with instruments continuously monitoring the samples for growth of bacteria or fungi. This allows for timely reporting of results and for the healthcare practitioner to direct antimicrobial therapy to the specific microbe present in the blood. Because treatment must be given as soon as possible in cases of sepsis, broad-spectrum antimicrobials that are effective against several types of bacteria are usually given intravenously while waiting for blood culture results. Antimicrobial therapy may be changed to a more targeted antibiotic therapy once the microbe causing the infection is identified.

How is the sample collected for testing?

Usually, two blood samples are collected from different veins to increase the likelihood of detecting bacteria or fungi if they are present in the blood. Multiple blood samples help to differentiate true pathogens, which will be present in more than one blood culture, from skin bacteria that may contaminate one of several blood cultures during the collection process. Blood is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. The phlebotomist will put the blood into two culture bottles containing broth to grow microbes. These two bottles constitute one blood culture set. A second set of blood cultures should be collected from a different site, immediately after the first venipuncture. A single blood culture may be collected from children since they often have high numbers of bacteria present in their blood when they have an infection. For infants and young children, the quantity of each blood sample will be smaller and appropriate for their body size.

Blood Culture(Normal)

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Blood Culture(Normal) Same day 500

Blood culture are procedures done to detect an infection in the blood and identify the cause. Infections of the bloodstream are most commonly caused by bacteria (bacteremia) but can also be caused by yeasts or other fungi (fungemia) or by a virus (viremia). Although blood can be used to test for viruses, this article focuses on the use of blood cultures to detect and identify bacteria and fungi in the blood. A blood infection typically originates from some other specific site within the body, spreading from that site when a person has a severe infection and/or the immune system cannot confine it to its source. For example, a urinary tract infection may spread from the bladder and/or kidneys into the blood and then be carried throughout the body, infecting other organs and causing a serious and sometimes life-threatening systemic infection. The terms septicemia and sepsis are sometimes used interchangeably to describe this condition. Septicemia refers to an infection of the blood while sepsis is the body's serious, overwhelming, and sometimes life-threatening response to infection. This condition often requires prompt and aggressive treatment, usually in an intensive care unit of a hospital. Other serious complications can result from an infection of the blood. Endocarditis, an inflammation and infection of the lining of the heart and/or of the heart valves, can result from a bloodstream infection. People who have prosthetic heart valves or prosthetic joints have a higher risk of a systemic infection following their surgery, although these infections are not common. Anyone with a weakened immune system due to an underlying disease, such as leukemia or HIV/AIDS, or due to immunosuppressive drugs such as those given for chemotherapy is at a higher risk for blood infections as their immune system is less capable of killing the microbes that occasionally enter the blood. Bacteria and yeasts may also be introduced directly into the bloodstream through intravenous drug use or through intravenous catheters or surgical drains. For blood cultures, multiple blood samples are usually collected for testing and from different veins to increase the likelihood of detecting the bacteria or fungi that may be present in small numbers and/or may enter the blood intermittently. This is also done to help ensure that any bacteria or fungi detected are the ones causing the infection and are not contaminants. Blood cultures are incubated for several days before being reported as negative. Some types of bacteria and fungi grow more slowly than others and/or may take longer to detect if initially present in low numbers. When a blood culture is positive, the specific microbe causing the infection is identified and susceptibility testing is performed to inform the healthcare practitioner which antibiotics are most likely to be effective for treatment. In many laboratories, the blood culture testing process is automated with instruments continuously monitoring the samples for growth of bacteria or fungi. This allows for timely reporting of results and for the healthcare practitioner to direct antimicrobial therapy to the specific microbe present in the blood. Because treatment must be given as soon as possible in cases of sepsis, broad-spectrum antimicrobials that are effective against several types of bacteria are usually given intravenously while waiting for blood culture results. Antimicrobial therapy may be changed to a more targeted antibiotic therapy once the microbe causing the infection is identified.

How is the sample collected for testing?

Usually, two blood samples are collected from different veins to increase the likelihood of detecting bacteria or fungi if they are present in the blood. Multiple blood samples help to differentiate true pathogens, which will be present in more than one blood culture, from skin bacteria that may contaminate one of several blood cultures during the collection process. Blood is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. The phlebotomist will put the blood into two culture bottles containing broth to grow microbes. These two bottles constitute one blood culture set. A second set of blood cultures should be collected from a different site, immediately after the first venipuncture. A single blood culture may be collected from children since they often have high numbers of bacteria present in their blood when they have an infection. For infants and young children, the quantity of each blood sample will be smaller and appropriate for their body size.

Blood lgE

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Blood lgE Serum 550 2 Days

Allergies are a common and chronic condition that involves the body's immune system. Normally, your immune system works to fight off viruses, bacteria, and other infectious agents. When you have an allergy, your immune system treats a harmless substance, like dust or pollen, as a threat. To fight this perceived threat, your immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E ( lgE ). Substances that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Besides dust and pollen, other common allergens include animal dander, foods, including nuts and shellfish, and certain medicines, such as penicillin. Allergy symptoms can range from sneezing and a stuffy nose to a life-threatening complication called anaphylactic shock. Allergy blood tests measure the amount of IgE antibodies in the blood. A small amount of IgE antibodies is normal. A larger amount of IgE may mean you have an allergy. Other names: lgE allergy test, Quantitative lgE, Immunoglobulin E, Total lgE, Specific lgE

What is it used for?

Allergy blood tests are used to find out if you have an allergy. One type of test called a total IgE test measures the overall number of IgE antibodies in your blood. Another type of allergy blood test called a specific IgE test measures the level of IgE antibodies in response to individual allergens.

Why do I need an allergy blood test?

Your health care provider may order allergy testing if you have symptoms of an allergy. These include:
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Hives (a rash with raised red patches)
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Shortness of breath
  • Coughing
  • Wheezing

Blood Sugar (FBS,PPBS, Random each)

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Blood Sugar Plasma Fluride 60 Same day

Glucose, a simple sugar is the major source of energy for all cells.  The three most frequently prescribed blood sugar tests to determine the glucose level in the blood are
  • FBS - Fasting sugar
  • PPBS- Post prandial sugar
  • GTT- Glucose tolerance test
F B S -The test has to be performed after twelve hours of fasting.  That means the person must refrain from eating approximately 12 hours prior to this test.
  PPBS - Prior to this test, the person fasts overnight and then consumes a carbohydrate meal.  Approximately between 1:30 to 2 hours after eating, a  blood sample from vein is drawn  for testing.G T T - The test is performed after consuming a concentrated amount of glucose dissolved in water.The above mentioned tests are to monitor, confirm or rule out the Diabetes.The state of increased sugar level  (above 140mg/dl)  is known as Hyperglycemia and the decreased blood sugar level is Hypoglycemia (Below 70mg/dl). The normal range of blood sugar is
  • RBS - 70-130mg/dl
  • FBS - 70-115mg/dl
  • PPBS-70-140mg/dl
R B S - Random blood Sugar  test, is also common to monitor glucose levels. In this case, the sample can be taken at any time irrespective of the consumption of food.
PPB - Prior to this test, the person fasts overnight and then consumes a carbohydrate meal.  Approximately between 1:30 to 2 hours after eating, a  sample from vein is drawn  for testing.G T T - The test is performed after consuming a concentrated amount of glucose dissolved in water.The above mentioned tests are to monitor, confirm or rule out the Diabetes.

Blood Sugar (FBS,PPBS, Random each)

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Blood Sugar Plasma Fluride 60 Same day

Glucose, a simple sugar is the major source of energy for all cells.  The three most frequently prescribed blood sugar tests to determine the glucose level in the blood are
  • FBS - Fasting sugar
  • PPBS- Post prandial sugar
  • GTT- Glucose tolerance test
F B S -The test has to be performed after twelve hours of fasting.  That means the person must refrain from eating approximately 12 hours prior to this test.
  PPBS - Prior to this test, the person fasts overnight and then consumes a carbohydrate meal.  Approximately between 1:30 to 2 hours after eating, a  blood sample from vein is drawn  for testing.G T T - The test is performed after consuming a concentrated amount of glucose dissolved in water.The above mentioned tests are to monitor, confirm or rule out the Diabetes.The state of increased sugar level  (above 140mg/dl)  is known as Hyperglycemia and the decreased blood sugar level is Hypoglycemia(Below 70mg/dl). The normal range of blood sugar is
  • RBS - 70-130mg/dl
  • FBS - 70-115mg/dl
  • PPBS-70-140mg/dl
R B S - Random blood Sugar  test, is also common to monitor glucose levels. In this case, the sample can be taken at any time irrespective of the consumption of food.
PPB - Prior to this test, the person fasts overnight and then consumes a carbohydrate meal.  Approximately between 1:30 to 2 hours after eating, a  sample from vein is drawn  for testing.G T T - The test is performed after consuming a concentrated amount of glucose dissolved in water.The above mentioned tests are to monitor, confirm or rule out the Diabetes.

BT, CT.

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BT, CT. Direct patient 60 same day

Bioterrorism agents are living organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi, or toxins that are deliberately used to sicken and kill. They may be used by terrorists partially because of their psychological impact on the public and partially because they can be deadly, are easy to distribute, are a relatively inexpensive weapon, and are difficult to detect. Bioterrorism agents have been used in acts of warfare for thousands of years. This has included dipping arrows into toxins, poisoning food and water supplies, and deliberately spreading deadly infections. Bioterrorism agents can be carried in food products, dispersed into the air or drinking water. Most potential bioterrorism agents are natural substances or microorganisms that normally cause a small number of deaths each year and/or during periodic outbreaks. They enter the body primarily by being inhaled into the lungs, ingested, through breaks in the skin, or through contact with the mucous membranes of the eyes and nose. Agents may be genetically altered by those seeking to use them as a weapon. They may be concentrated, made easier to disperse (aerosolized), made more likely to infect, and/or made more resistant to treatment. Some agents cause infections that can be passed easily from person-to-person and would need to be quickly contained, while others, such as anthrax, typically affect only the person exposed but can be deadly without prompt treatment.

BUN(Blood,Urea,Nitrogen)

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BUN(Blood,Urea,Nitrogen) Serum 120 same day

Urea is a waste product formed in the liver when protein is metabolized into its component parts (amino acids) . This process produces ammonia, which is then converted into the less toxic waste product urea. This test measures the amount of urea nitrogen in the blood. N is a component of both ammonia and urea. Urea and urea nitrogen are referred to somewhat interchangeably because urea contains nitrogen and because urea/urea nitrogen is the "transport method" used by the body to rid itself of excess nitrogen. Urea is released by the liver into the blood and is carried to the kidneys, where it is filtered out of the blood and released into the urine. Since this is an ongoing process, there is usually a small but stable amount of urea N in the blood. Most diseases or conditions that affect the kidneys or liver have the potential to affect the amount of urea present in the blood. If increased amounts of urea are produced by the liver or if the kidneys are not working properly and have difficulty filtering wastes out of the blood, then urea concentrations will rise in the blood. If significant liver damage or disease inhibits the production of urea, then BUN concentrations may fall.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is drawn from a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.
Accordion

CA-125

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CA-125 SERUM 800 Next day

Cancer Antigen 125 (CA-125) is a protein that is present on the surface of most, but not all, ovarian cancer cells. This makes the test useful as a tumor marker in specific circumstances. The CA-125 test measures the amount of CA-125 in the blood. Significantly elevated concentrations of CA-125 may be present in the blood of a woman who has ovarian cancer. Thus the test may be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment and/or for recurrence of the cancer. However, not all women with ovarian cancer will have elevated CA-125 so the test may not be useful in all cases. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), the lifetime risk of a woman developing ovarian cancer is about 1 in 75 and the lifetime risk of death is 1 in 100. ACS estimates that about 22,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S. and about 14,000 women die of it. Currently, less than 20% of ovarian cancers are found in the early stages before they have spread outside the ovary. The primary reason they go undetected is that the symptoms of ovarian cancer are fairly non-specific. The need for a reliable method for early detection of ovarian cancer among asymptomatic women continues to drive ongoing research. In the meantime, regular physicals, pelvic exams, and an awareness of family history and symptoms are important. CA-125 is not recommended as a screening test for asymptomatic women because it is non-specific. Small quantities of CA-125 are produced by normal tissues throughout the body and by some other cancers. Levels in the blood may be moderately elevated with a variety of non-cancerous conditions, including menstruation, pregnancy, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Ca( Calcium Urine)

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Ca( Calcium Urine) 24 hrs Urine 150 same day

A urine calcium test is done to measure how much calcium is passed out of the body through urine. The test is also known as the urinary Ca+2 test. Calcium is the most common mineral in the body. All cells throughout the body use calcium for various functions. The body uses calcium to build and repair bones and teeth. Calcium also helps nerves, the heart, and muscles function properly, and helps blood to clot. Most of the calcium in the body is stored in bones. The remainder is found in the blood. When Ca levels in the blood get too low, the bones release enough Ca to bring the level in the blood back to normal. When Ca levels get too high, the surplus of Ca  is either stored in bones or expelled from the body through your urine or stool. The amount of Ca that’s in your body depends on the following factors:
  • amount of Ca  taken in from food
  • amount of Ca and vitamin D absorbed through the intestines
  • level of phosphate in the body
  • certain hormone levels — such as estrogen, calcitonin, and parathyroid hormone
Most often, people who have high or low levels of Ca do not show any symptoms. Ca levels need to be extremely high or extremely low to show symptoms.

Why is the urine Ca test performed?

Reasons to perform a urine Ca test include:
  • evaluating whether high Ca levels in the urine resulted in the development of a kidney stone
  • evaluating whether your dietary intake of Ca is high enough
  • evaluating how well your intestines are absorbing Ca
  • detecting conditions that lead to Ca loss from your bones
  • evaluating how well your kidneys are functioning
  • looking for problems with the parathyroid gland
A blood Ca test is usually more accurate in detecting certain conditions like specific bone diseases, pancreatitis, and hyperparathyroidism.

Ca++ (Lonized Calcium)

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Ca++ (Lonized Calcium) Serum 150 same day

Calcium is the most abundant and one of the most important minerals in the body. It is essential for cell signaling and the proper functioning of muscles, nerves, and the heart. Ca+ is needed for blood clotting and is crucial for the formation, density, and maintenance of bones. This test measures the amount of calcium in the blood or urine. About 99% of Ca+ is found complexed in the bones, while the remaining 1% circulates in the blood. Ca+ levels are tightly controlled; if there is too little absorbed or ingested, or if there is excess loss through the kidney or gut, Ca+ is taken from bone to maintain blood concentrations. Roughly half of the Ca+ in the blood is "free" and is metabolically active. The remaining half is "bound" to albumin, with a smaller amount complexed to anions, such as phosphate, and these bound and complexed forms are metabolically inactive. There are two tests to measure blood calcium. The total calcium test measures both the free and bound forms. The ionized calcium test measures only the free, metabolically active form. Some Ca+ is lost from the body every day, filtered from the blood by the kidneys and excreted into the urine. Measurement of the amount of calcium in the urine is used to determine how much calcium the kidneys are eliminating.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is taken by needle from a vein in the arm. If a urine collection is required, a 24-hour urine sample or a timed collection of a shorter duration is obtained. Sometimes a random urine collection may be used, although a timed collection is preferred.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

Current practices do not require fasting. You may be instructed to stop taking certain medications, such as lithium, antacids, diurectics, and vitamin D supplements, among others, to ensure the most accurate test results.

Calcium ( Blood )

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Calcium ( Blood ) Serum 150 same day

The total calcium blood test is used to measure the total amount of calcium in your blood. Calcium is one of the most important minerals in your body. Most of your body’s calcium is stored in your bones. Your body requires calcium to maintain healthy bones and teeth. It’s also essential for keeping your nerves, heart, and muscles functioning properly. Since calcium is so important for many of your body’s functions, its levels need to be within a tight range. A second calcium blood test, called the ionized calcium blood test, measures the amount of “free” calcium present in your blood. “Free calcium” refers to calcium that’s not bound to any proteins and not together with an anion in your blood. In addition to these two calcium tests, the level of calcium in your urine can be measured as well.

Test uses and purpose

Your doctor will typically order a total calcium test as part of a routine metabolic panel during a general physical examination. If you have symptoms of high or low calcium levels, your doctor may order a calcium test. Your doctor may also order a calcium test if they suspect that you have kidney disease, parathyroid disease, cancer, or malnutrition.

Test preparation

Your doctor may request that you fast or stop taking certain medications or supplements before the test. These medications can include:
  • lithium
  • thiazide diuretics
  • antacids containing calcium
  • vitamin D supplements
  • calcium supplements
Be sure your doctor is aware of the medications and supplements that you’re taking so that they can give you appropriate guidelines before your test. Additionally, consuming large amount of foods or drinks that contain calcium can increase the levels of calcium in your and affect test results.

Calcium ( Blood )

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Calcium ( Blood ) Serum 150 same day

The total calcium blood test is used to measure the total amount of calcium in your blood. Calcium is one of the most important minerals in your body. Most of your body’s calcium is stored in your bones. Your body requires calcium to maintain healthy bones and teeth. It’s also essential for keeping your nerves, heart, and muscles functioning properly. Since calcium is so important for many of your body’s functions, its levels need to be within a tight range. A second calcium blood test, called the ionized calcium blood test, measures the amount of “free” calcium present in your blood. “Free calcium” refers to calcium that’s not bound to any proteins and not together with an anion in your blood. In addition to these two calcium tests, the level of calcium in your urine can be measured as well.

Test uses and purpose

Your doctor will typically order a total calcium test as part of a routine metabolic panel during a general physical examination. If you have symptoms of high or low calcium levels, your doctor may order a calcium test. Your doctor may also order a calcium test if they suspect that you have kidney disease, parathyroid disease, cancer, or malnutrition.

Test preparation

Your doctor may request that you fast or stop taking certain medications or supplements before the test. These medications can include:
  • lithium
  • thiazide diuretics
  • antacids containing calcium
  • vitamin D supplements
  • calcium supplements
Be sure your doctor is aware of the medications and supplements that you’re taking so that they can give you appropriate guidelines before your test. Additionally, consuming large amount of foods or drinks that contain calcium can increase the levels of calcium in your and affect test results.

Calcium Phosphate Ratio

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Calcium Phosphate Ratio Serum 250 same day

the effect of dietary calcium:phosphorus (Ca:P) ratio on bone mineralization and intestinal Ca absorption in ovariectomized (OVX) rat models of osteoporosis and sham-operated rats. Thirty 12-wk-old female Wistar rats were divided into three groups of OVX rats and three groups of sham rats. Thirty days after the adaptation period, OVX rats and sham rats were fed a diet formulated Ca:P, 1:0.5, 1:1 or 1:2 (each diet containing 0.5% Ca), respectively for 42 d. In both sham and OVX rats, serum osteocalcin, a marker of bone turnover, was increased by decreasing Ca:P ratio (1:2). In contrast, rats fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet (dietary P restriction) suppressed the increased serum parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline, and increased Ca absorption in both sham and OVX rats compared to the Ca:P = 1:1 and 1:2 diets. Especially, in OVX rats, the decreased bone mineral density of the fifth lumbar was also suppressed when rats were fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet. These results indicated that the elevation of dietary Ca:P ratio may inhibit bone loss and increase intestinal Ca absorption in OVX rats. the effect of dietary calcium:phosphorus (Ca:P) ratio on bone mineralization and intestinal Ca absorption in ovariectomized (OVX) rat models of osteoporosis and sham-operated rats. Thirty 12-wk-old female Wistar rats were divided into three groups of OVX rats and three groups of sham rats. Thirty days after the adaptation period, OVX rats and sham rats were fed a diet formulated Ca:P, 1:0.5, 1:1 or 1:2 (each diet containing 0.5% Ca), respectively for 42 d. In both sham and OVX rats, serum osteocalcin, a marker of bone turnover, was increased by decreasing Ca:P ratio (1:2). In contrast, rats fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet (dietary P restriction) suppressed the increased serum parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline, and increased Ca absorption in both sham and OVX rats compared to the Ca:P = 1:1 and 1:2 diets. Especially, in OVX rats, the decreased bone mineral density of the fifth lumbar was also suppressed when rats were fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet. These results indicated that the elevation of dietary Ca:P ratio may inhibit bone loss and increase intestinal Ca absorption in OVX rats.

CBC (Complete Blood Count )

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CBC EDTA Blood 150 same day

A complete blood count, or CBC, is an easy and very common test that screens for certain disorders that can affect your health. A CBC determines if there are any increases or decreases in your blood cell counts. Normal values vary depending on your age and your gender. Your lab report will tell you the normal value range for your age and gender. A CBC can help diagnose a broad range of conditions, from anemia and infection to cancer.

The three basic types of blood cells

Measuring changes in your blood cell levels can help your doctor evaluate your overall health and detect disorders. The test measures the three basic types of blood cells.

Red blood cells

Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout your body and remove carbon dioxide. A CBC measures two components of your red blood cells:
  • hemoglobin: oxygen-carrying protein
  • hematocrit: percentage of red blood cells in your blood
Low levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit are often signs of anemia, a condition that occurs when blood is deficient in iron.

White blood cells

White blood cells help your body fight infection. A CBC measures the number and types of white blood cells in your body. Any abnormal increases or decreases in the number or types of white blood cells could be a sign of infection, inflammation, or cancer.

Platelets

Platelets help your blood clot and control bleeding. When a cut stops bleeding, it’s because platelets are doing their job. Any changes in platelet levels can put you at risk for excessive bleeding and can be a sign of a serious medical condition.

CCT ( Creatinine Clearance Test)/GFR

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CCT ( Creatinine Clearance Test)/GFR Serum , 24 hrs urine patient height and weight 200 same day

Creatinine is a chemical waste product produced by muscle metabolism. When your kidneys are functioning normally, they filter creatinine and other waste products out of your blood. These waste products are removed from your body through urination. A creatinine urine test measures the amount of creatinine in your urine. The test can help your doctor evaluate how well your kidneys are functioning. This is useful for diagnosing or ruling out kidney disease and other conditions affecting the kidneys. Your doctor may use a random urine sample to test for creatinine. However, they’ll order a urine 24-hour volume test in most cases. Although one sample of urine can be tested for creatinine, it’s more accurate to collect the urine for a whole day to get that value. The creatinine in your urine can vary a lot based on diet, exercise, and hydration levels, so a spot check is not as helpful. As the name suggests, this creatinine urine test measures the amount of urine produced in a day. It isn’t a painful test, and there aren’t any risks associated with it.

How do I prepare for the 24-hour volume test?

The 24-hour volume test is noninvasive and involves only the collection of urine. You’ll be given one or more containers for collecting and storing urine. Since this test involves collecting and storing urine for a 24-hour period, you may want to consider scheduling the test for a day when you’re at home.

Before the test, you should do the following:

  • Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or think you may be pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements or prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Some supplements and drugs can interfere with the test results. Your doctor can tell you which ones to avoid.
  • Avoid certain foods or beverages if advised by your doctor.
  • Ask your doctor if you need to begin the test at a particular time of day.
  • Make sure you understand when and where you should return the container of urine.

Chikungunya

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Chikungunya Serum 700 3 Days

Your doctor might recommend a series of blood tests to detect the presence of chikungunya virus or antibodies. The blood test involves the testing of the serum or plasma to detect virus or viral nucleic acid, virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M and neutralising antibodies. In addition to this, a complete blood count test ( CBC) might also be recommended for lymphocytes and platelet count. When should you consult a doctor? If you experience any symptoms of virus, it is wise to consult your doctor immediately. As the virus is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected mosquitoes, the risk of a person transmitting the virus to a biting mosquito or through blood is highest during the first week of illness. During the first 8 days of illness, viral RNA (RT_PCR) can often be identified in serum. virus antibodies (ELISA) normally develop toward the end of the first week of illness. The incubation period is typically 3–7 days (which can range from 1–12 days).  Hence, getting tested for virus during the first week of infection is best to get positive results. Do not mistake virus with dengue or malaria. Here’s how chikungunya fever is different from dengue fever and malaria. The virus causes a fever that lasts a few days and joint pain that can last weeks or months. The symptoms of chikungunya virus are similar to those of other diseases such as dengue fever. The symptoms normally appear just a few days after a mosquito has bitten an individual. The most common symptoms are:

  • fever (sometimes as high as 104 °F)
  • joint pain
  • headache
  • muscle pain
  • rash
  • swelling around the joints
Less commonly, symptoms can be accompanied by a maculopapular rash (similar to measles or heat rash), conjunctivitis, nausea, and vomiting.

Diagnosis

The only way to diagnose chikungunya is by a blood test.
Only a blood test can definitively diagnose chikungunya as symptoms are not always easy to tell apart from other conditions. It is important to rule out dengue fever as quickly as possible because of its higher rate of mortality - up to 50 percent if untreated, compared with 0.1 percent for chikungunya. If an individual with the symptoms outlined above has recently visited an area where either of these diseases are common, they should visit a doctor as soon as possible.

Treatment

The virus is rarely fatal, but the symptoms can be severe and disabling. Most patients recover from the fever within a week, but the joint pain has been known to persist for months. Even after 1 year, 20 percent of patients report recurring joint pain. There are no specific drugs to treat chikungunya; doctors simply recommend rest and plenty of fluids. Over-the-counter medications will help ease fever and joint pain. These include:
  • naproxen
  • ibuprofen
  • acetaminophen
For longer-lasting aches, physiotherapy may be helpful.

Chikungunya vaccine

Currently, there is no vaccine or antiviral treatment, but, in general, the disease is short-lived and rarely fatal. Medication focuses on relieving the symptoms rather than the cause. The National Institute of Health (NIH) are currently funding a phase 2 clinical trial of a chikungunya vaccine. The vaccine consists of so-called virus-like particles (VLPs) rather than inactivated or weakened viruses. VLP-based vaccines can stimulate immune responses similar to those generated by naturally acquired immunity following viral infection. However, VLPs are not infectious and cannot replicate. Since whole viruses are not used to produce VLP vaccines, they do not need to be prepared in high-level biocontainment facilities.

Cholesterol HDL

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Cholesterol HDL 12-14 hrs Fasting/ Serum 120 Next day

High-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, HDL-C) is one of the classes of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol in the blood. HDL-C consists primarily of protein with a small amount of cholesterol. It is considered to be beneficial because it removes excess cholesterol from tissues and carries it to the liver for disposal. Hence,  cholesterol is often termed "good" cholesterol. The test for cholesterol measures the amount of HDL-C in blood. High levels of cholesterol have been shown to be associated with the development of hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) and heart disease. When cholesterol levels in the blood increase (not enough is removed by HDL), it may be deposited on the walls of blood vessels. These deposits, termed plaques, can build up, causing vessel walls to become more rigid, and may eventually narrow the openings of blood vessels, constricting the flow of blood. A higher level of blood HDL-C is usually associated with a lower risk of developing plaques, lowering the risk of heart attack or stroke.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. Sometimes a drop of blood is collected by puncturing the skin on a fingertip. This fingerstick sample is typically used when HDL-C is being measured on a portable testing device, for example, at a health fair.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

Since this test is usually performed as part of a complete lipid profile, fasting for 9 to 12 hours before sample collection is typically required; only water is permitted. Your healthcare practitioner may decide that you may be tested without fasting. Follow any instructions you are given and tell the person drawing your blood whether or not you have fasted. For youths without risk factors, testing may be done without fasting.

Cholesterol LDL

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Cholesterol LDL 12-14 hrs Fasting/ Serum 200 same day

LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, a type of cholesterol found in your body. LDL is often referred to as bad cholesterol. This is because too much lipid results in a build-up of cholesterol in your arteries, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes. If you have high levels of good cholesterol, called high-density lipoprotein (HDL), it may decrease your risk of developing heart disease. HDL helps transport lipid cholesterol to your liver to be broken down and thus helps avoid damage to your heart. Your doctor may order an LDL test as part of a routine exam to determine your risk for heart disease and decide if any treatment is necessary.
  • have a family history of heart disease
  • smoke cigarettes
  • are obese, meaning you have a body mass index (BMI) that is 30 or higher
  • have low HDL (good cholesterol) levels
  • have hypertension (or high blood pressure) or are receiving treatment for hypertension
  • have diabetes
Your doctor may also order an lipid test if you are already being treated for high cholesterol. In this case, the test is used to determine if lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise, or medications are lowering your cholesterol successfully. Children normally don’t need to be tested for lipid levels. However, children who are at a greater risk — such as those who are obese or who have diabetes or hypertension — should have their first LDL testing done between the ages of 2 and 10.

Why Is an LDL Test Necessary?

High cholesterol does not generally cause any symptoms, so it is necessary to check for it routinely. High cholesterol raises your chances of having certain medical conditions, some of which are life threatening.

High cholesterol raises your risk of:

  • coronary heart disease
  • atherosclerosis, which is a build-up of plaque in your arteries
  • angina, or chest pain
  • heart attack
  • stroke
  • carotid artery disease
  • peripheral arterial disease

Cholesterol Total

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Cholesteral Total Serum 100 same day

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your liver makes cholesterol, and it is also in some foods, such as meat and dairy products. Your body needs some it to work properly. But if you have too much it in your blood, you have a higher risk of coronary artery disease.

How do you measure cholesterol levels?

A blood test called a lipoprotein panel can measure your its levels. Before the test, you'll need to fast (not eat or drink anything but water) for 9 to 12 hours. The test gives information about your
  • Total test- a measure of the total amount of it in your blood. It includes the two types - low-density lipoprotein (LDL) it and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
  • LDL (bad) test- the main source of it buildup and blockage in the arteries
  • HDL (good) it - HDL helps remove it from your arteries
  • Non-HDL - this number is your total it minus your HDL. Your non-HDL includes LDL and other types of it such as VLDL (very-low-density lipoprotein).
  • Triglycerides - another form of fat in your blood that can raise your risk for heart disease, especially in women

What do my cholesterol numbers mean?

it numbers are measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Here are the healthy levels of cholesterol, based on your age and gender: is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your liver makes cholesterol, and it is also in some foods, such as meat and dairy products. Your body needs some it to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, you have a higher risk of coronary artery disease.

Cholesterol Total

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Cholesterol Total Serum 100 same day

A complete cholesterol test is also called a lipid panel or lipid profile. Your doctor can use it to measure the amount of “good” and “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of fat, in your blood. Cholesterols is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

Cholesterols is a soft, waxy fat that your body needs to function properly. However, too much cholesterol can lead to:

  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • atherosclerosis, a clogging or hardening of your arteries

Who Is at Risk of High Cholesterols?

Testing is very important if you:
  • have a family history of high cholesterol or heart disease
  • are overweight or obese
  • drink alcohol frequently
  • smoke cigarettes
  • lead an inactive lifestyle
  • have diabetes, kidney disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, or an underactive thyroid gland

All of these things can increase your risk of developing high cholesterol.

What Does a Test Measure?

A complete cholesterols test measures four types of lipids, or fats, in your blood:
  • Total : This is the total amount of cholesterols in your blood.
  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterols: This is referred to as “bad” cholesterol. Too much of it raises your risk of heart attack, stroke, and atherosclerosis.
  • High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterols: This is referred to as “good” because it helps remove LDL cholesterols from your blood.
  • Triglycerides: When you eat, your body converts the calories it doesn’t need into triglycerides, which are stored in your fat cells. People who are overweight, diabetic, eat too many sweets, or drink too much alcohol can have high triglyceride levels.

Cholesterol Total

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Cholesteral Total Serum 100 same day

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your liver makes cholesterol, and it is also in some foods, such as meat and dairy products. Your body needs some it to work properly. But if you have too much it in your blood, you have a higher risk of coronary artery disease.

How do you measure cholesterol levels?

A blood test called a lipoprotein panel can measure your its levels. Before the test, you'll need to fast (not eat or drink anything but water) for 9 to 12 hours. The test gives information about your
  • Total test- a measure of the total amount of it in your blood. It includes the two types - low-density lipoprotein (LDL) it and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
  • LDL (bad) test- the main source of it buildup and blockage in the arteries
  • HDL (good) it - HDL helps remove it from your arteries
  • Non-HDL - this number is your total it minus your HDL. Your non-HDL includes LDL and other types of it such as VLDL (very-low-density lipoprotein).
  • Triglycerides - another form of fat in your blood that can raise your risk for heart disease, especially in women

What do my cholesterol numbers mean?

it numbers are measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Here are the healthy levels of cholesterol, based on your age and gender: is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your liver makes cholesterol, and it is also in some foods, such as meat and dairy products. Your body needs some it to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, you have a higher risk of coronary artery disease.

Cholesterol VLDL

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Cholesterol VLDL 12-14 hrs Fasting/ Serum 150 Next day

Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is one of the four major lipoprotein particles. The other three are high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and chylomicrons. Each particle contains a mixture of cholesterol, triglyceride, and protein, but in varying amounts unique to each type of particle. LDL contains the highest amount of cholesterol. HDL contains the highest amount of protein. VLDL and chylomicrons contain the highest amount of triglyceride. VLDL particles are released into the blood by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream, ultimately being converted into LDL as they lose triglyceride, having carried it to other parts of the body. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines ATP III, there is growing evidence that VLDL plays an important role in atherogenesis, in which plaques form on the interior walls of arteries, narrowing these passageways and restricting blood flow, which can lead to heart disease and increase the risk of stroke. At present there is no simple, direct way of measuring VLDL cholesterol. However, since VLDL-C contains most of the circulating triglyceride (if a person is fasting) and since the composition of the different particles is relatively constant, it is possible to estimate the amount of VLDL-C based on the triglyceride value. To estimate VLDL-C, divide the triglyceride value by 5 if the value is in mg/dL or divide by 2.2 if the value is in mmol/L. This estimate is used in most settings. The calculation is not valid, however, when the triglyceride level is greater than 400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L) because other lipoproteins are usually present. Triglycerides testing most often requires that the patient fast before sample collection; otherwise these calculations may be invalid.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. Sometimes a drop of blood is collected by puncturing the skin on a fingertip.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

Since VLDL-C is usually calculated from the triglyceride level, preparation is the same as for the triglyceride test. Current recommendations for this testing include fasting (having nothing to eat or drink except water) for 9 to 12 hours beforehand and avoiding alcohol consumption for at least 24 hours before the test. Follow any instructions you are given.

CK-MB

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CPK-MB Serum 500 same day

Creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) is a form of an enzyme found primarily in heart muscle cells. This test measures CK-MB in the blood. CK-MB is one of three forms (isoenzymes) of the enzyme creatine kinase (CK). These isoenzymes include:

  • CK-MM (found in skeletal muscles and the heart)
  • CK-MB (found mostly in the heart, but small amounts found in skeletal muscles)
  • CK-BB (found mostly in the brain and smooth muscle, such as the intestines and uterus)
CK is released from muscle cells and is detectable in the blood whenever there is muscle damage. The small amount of CK that is normally in the blood is primarily CK-MM. CK-BB almost never gets into the blood, and CK-MB will typically only be present in significant amounts when the heart is damaged. A CK test measures the total level but does not distinguish between the three isoenzymes. When there is an increased amount of CK present in the blood, the CK test can be used to determine whether it is due to heart damage or is more likely to be related to skeletal muscle injury.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is taken by needle from a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is usually needed because the test is done in emergency care.

CL -( Chloride Blood)

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CL -( Cloride Blood) Serum 150 same day

Chloride is an electrolyte that helps keep a proper fluid and acid-base balance in your body. The chloride blood test, or serum chloride level, is often a part of a comprehensive metabolic panel or a basic metabolic panel. A metabolic panel also measures your levels of other electrolytes, including carbon dioxide, potassium, and sodium. The proper balance of these electrolytes is critical for the normal functioning of the muscles, heart, and nerves. It’s also essential for normal fluid absorption and excretion. This test detects abnormal blood chloride levels for your doctor to diagnose certain health conditions. These conditions include alkalosis, which happens when your blood is either too alkaline or basic, and acidosis, which happens when your blood is too acidic. The blood test can also be used to monitor conditions such as:
  • high blood pressure
  • heart failure
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
These conditions can cause an electrolyte imbalance. The symptoms that may indicate a chloride imbalance include:
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • breathing problems
  • frequent vomiting
  • prolonged diarrhea
  • excessive thirst
  • high blood pressure

How do I prepare for a chloride blood test?

For accurate results, you shouldn’t drink or eat anything during the eight hours leading up to the test. Hormones, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and diuretics can affect your test results. You should avoid taking them if you can. Tell your doctor about any medications you take and whether they’re over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription drugs. You may need to stop taking these medications before the test.
This test detects abnormal blood chloride levels for your doctor to diagnose certain health conditions. These conditions include alkalosis, which happens when your blood is either too alkaline or basic, and acidosis, which happens when your blood is too acidic. The blood test can also be used to monitor conditions such as:

CL -( Chloride Blood)

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CL -( Cloride Blood) Serum 200 same day

Chloride is an electrolyte that helps keep a proper fluid and acid-base balance in your body. The chloride blood test, or serum chloride level, is often a part of a comprehensive metabolic panel or a basic metabolic panel. A metabolic panel also measures your levels of other electrolytes, including carbon dioxide, potassium, and sodium. The proper balance of these electrolytes is critical for the normal functioning of the muscles, heart, and nerves. It’s also essential for normal fluid absorption and excretion. This test detects abnormal blood chloride levels for your doctor to diagnose certain health conditions. These conditions include alkalosis, which happens when your blood is either too alkaline or basic, and acidosis, which happens when your blood is too acidic. The blood test can also be used to monitor conditions such as:
  • high blood pressure
  • heart failure
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
These conditions can cause an electrolyte imbalance. The symptoms that may indicate a chloride imbalance include:
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • breathing problems
  • frequent vomiting
  • prolonged diarrhea
  • excessive thirst
  • high blood pressure

How do I prepare for a chloride blood test?

For accurate results, you shouldn’t drink or eat anything during the eight hours leading up to the test. Hormones, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and diuretics can affect your test results. You should avoid taking them if you can. Tell your doctor about any medications you take and whether they’re over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription drugs. You may need to stop taking these medications before the test.
This test detects abnormal blood chloride levels for your doctor to diagnose certain health conditions. These conditions include alkalosis, which happens when your blood is either too alkaline or basic, and acidosis, which happens when your blood is too acidic. The blood test can also be used to monitor conditions such as:

CL ( Chloride Urine)

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CL ( Cloride Urine) Random/24 hrs Urine 200 same day

Chloride is an electrolyte. It is a negatively charged ion that works with other electrolytes, such as potassium, sodium, and bicarbonate, to help regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base balance. This test measures the level of Cl in the blood and/or urine. Cl is present in all body fluids but is found in the highest concentration in the blood and in the fluid outside of the body's cells. Most of the time, Cl concentrations mirror those of sodium, increasing and decreasing for the same reasons and in direct relationship to sodium. When there is an acid-base imbalance, however, blood Cl levels can change independently of sodium levels as Cl acts as a buffer. It helps to maintain electrical neutrality at the cellular level by moving into or out of the cells as needed. We get Cl in our diet through food and table salt, which is made up of sodium and Cl ions. Most of the chloride is absorbed by the digestive tract, and the excess is eliminated in urine. The normal blood level remains steady, with a slight drop after meals (because the stomach produces acid after eating, using chloride from blood). Cl is present in all body fluids but is found in the highest concentration in the blood and in the fluid outside of the body's cells. Most of the time, Cl concentrations mirror those of sodium, increasing and decreasing for the same reasons and in direct relationship to sodium. When there is an acid-base imbalance, however, blood Cl levels can change independently of sodium levels as Cl acts as a buffer. It helps to maintain electrical neutrality at the cellular level by moving into or out of the cells as needed.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is taken by needle from a vein in the arm. Cl can also be measured in a random or 24-hour urine sample.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Complete Hemogram

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Complete Hemogram Slides/EDTA 150 same day

Hemogram test is performed on a sample of blood to measure the level of WBC Total Count, Neutrophils, Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Basophils, Eosinophils, RBC Count, HCT, Hb, MCV and ESR in the blood.It is performed to detect Infection

Preparation for Hemogram Test

No special preparation is needed for Hemogram Test. Inform your doctor if you are on any medications or have any underlying medical conditions or allergies before undergoing Hemogram Test. Your doctor depending on your condition will give specific instructions.

Price for Hemogram Test

Average price range of the test is between Rs.300 to Rs.460 depending on the factors of city, quality and availablity.

Normal values for Hemogram Test

The normal result for Hemogram Test for WBC Total Count is WBC-4000 to 11000 cells for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Neutrophils is WBC-4000 to 11000 cells for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Neutrophils is 40-70% for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Lymphocytes is 20-40% for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Monocytes is 2-10% for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Basophils is 1-2% for Unisex gender and for All age groups. Eosinophils is 1-8% for Unisex gender and for All age groups. RBC Count is 4.5 - 6.5 million/cumm for Male gender and for All age groups, 3.8 - 5.8 million/cumm for Female gender and for All age groups. HCT is 40.7-50.3% for Male gender and for All age groups, 36.1 to 44.3% for Female gender and for All age groups. Hb is 13.8-17.2 gm/dl for Male gender and for All age groups, 12.5-15.1g/dl for Female gender and for All age groups. MCV is 80-95fl for Unisex gender and for All age groups. ESR is 0 - 20 mm/hr for Male gender and for All age groups, 0 - 22 mm/hr for Female gender and for All age groups.

Coomb Test direct

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Comb Test direct EDTA Blood 280 same day

This Coomb test detects immunoglobulin and/or complement bound to red blood cells. Immunoglobulin and complement are involved in the immune system. This test is used to evaluate for antibody-induced hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells).

What are other names for this Coomb test?

  • Anti-human globulin test, direct
  • DAT - Direct antiglobulin test
  • DCT - Direct Coombs test
  • Direct antiglobulin test

What are related Coomb  tests?

  • Reticulocyte count
  • Serum haptoglobin measurement
  • Serum unconjugated bilirubin measurement
  • Bilirubin, neonatal measurement
  • Complete blood count
  • Direct antiglobulin test, complement-specific reagent
  • Direct antiglobulin test, IgG-specific reagent
  • Lactate dehydrogenase measurement

Why do I need this Coomb test?

Laboratory tests may be done for many reasons. Tests are performed for routine health screenings or if a disease or toxicity is suspected. Lab tests may be used to determine if a medical condition is improving or worsening. Lab tests may also be used to measure the success or failure of a medication or treatment plan. Lab tests may be ordered for professional or legal reasons. You may need this test if you have:
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Hemolytic disease of fetus OR newborn due to ABO immunization
  • HUS - Hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria
  • Transfusion reaction due to blood group antibody-antigen mismatch

When and how often should I have this test?

When and how often laboratory tests are done may depend on many factors. The timing of laboratory tests may rely on the results or completion of other tests, procedures, or treatments. Lab tests may be performed immediately in an emergency, or tests may be delayed as a condition is treated or monitored. A test may be suggested or become necessary when certain signs or symptoms appear. Due to changes in the way your body naturally functions through the course of a day, lab tests may need to be performed at a certain time of day. If you have prepared for a test by changing your food or fluid intake, lab tests may be timed in accordance with those changes. Timing of tests may be based on increased and decreased levels of medications, drugs or other substances in the body. The age or gender of the person being tested may affect when and how often a lab test is required. Chronic or progressive conditions may need ongoing monitoring through the use of lab tests. Conditions that worsen and improve may also need frequent monitoring. Certain tests may be repeated to obtain a series of results, or tests may need to be repeated to confirm or disprove results. Timing and frequency of lab tests may vary if they are performed for professional or legal reasons.

How should I get ready for the test?

Before having blood collected, tell the person drawing your blood if you are allergic to latex. Tell the healthcare worker if you have a medical condition or are using a medication or supplement that causes excessive bleeding. Also tell the healthcare worker if you have felt nauseated, lightheaded, or have fainted while having blood drawn in the past.

Coomb Test direct

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Comb Test direct EDTA Blood 280 same day

This Coomb test detects immunoglobulin and/or complement bound to red blood cells. Immunoglobulin and complement are involved in the immune system. This test is used to evaluate for antibody-induced hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells).

What are other names for this Coomb test?

  • Anti-human globulin test, direct
  • DAT - Direct antiglobulin test
  • DCT - Direct Coombs test
  • Direct antiglobulin test

What are related Coomb  tests?

  • Reticulocyte count
  • Serum haptoglobin measurement
  • Serum unconjugated bilirubin measurement
  • Bilirubin, neonatal measurement
  • Complete blood count
  • Direct antiglobulin test, complement-specific reagent
  • Direct antiglobulin test, IgG-specific reagent
  • Lactate dehydrogenase measurement

Why do I need this Coomb test?

Laboratory tests may be done for many reasons. Tests are performed for routine health screenings or if a disease or toxicity is suspected. Lab tests may be used to determine if a medical condition is improving or worsening. Lab tests may also be used to measure the success or failure of a medication or treatment plan. Lab tests may be ordered for professional or legal reasons. You may need this test if you have:
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Hemolytic disease of fetus OR newborn due to ABO immunization
  • HUS - Hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria
  • Transfusion reaction due to blood group antibody-antigen mismatch

When and how often should I have this test?

When and how often laboratory tests are done may depend on many factors. The timing of laboratory tests may rely on the results or completion of other tests, procedures, or treatments. Lab tests may be performed immediately in an emergency, or tests may be delayed as a condition is treated or monitored. A test may be suggested or become necessary when certain signs or symptoms appear. Due to changes in the way your body naturally functions through the course of a day, lab tests may need to be performed at a certain time of day. If you have prepared for a test by changing your food or fluid intake, lab tests may be timed in accordance with those changes. Timing of tests may be based on increased and decreased levels of medications, drugs or other substances in the body. The age or gender of the person being tested may affect when and how often a lab test is required. Chronic or progressive conditions may need ongoing monitoring through the use of lab tests. Conditions that worsen and improve may also need frequent monitoring. Certain tests may be repeated to obtain a series of results, or tests may need to be repeated to confirm or disprove results. Timing and frequency of lab tests may vary if they are performed for professional or legal reasons.

How should I get ready for the test?

Before having blood collected, tell the person drawing your blood if you are allergic to latex. Tell the healthcare worker if you have a medical condition or are using a medication or supplement that causes excessive bleeding. Also tell the healthcare worker if you have felt nauseated, lightheaded, or have fainted while having blood drawn in the past.

Coomb Test Indirect

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Comb Test Indirect Serum 250 same day

The indirect Coomb test identifies antibodies to red blood cells. This test is used to help screen for suspected ABO incompatibility reaction. It is also used when an Rh incompatibility reaction in pregnant women is suspected.

What are other names for this Coomb test?

  • IAGT - Indirect antiglobulin test
  • IAT - Indirect antiglobulin test
  • Indirect antiglobulin test

What are related tests?

  • ABO antigen type determination

Why do I need this Coomb test?

Laboratory tests may be done for many reasons. Tests are performed for routine health screenings or if a disease or toxicity is suspected. Lab tests may be used to determine if a medical condition is improving or worsening. Lab tests may also be used to measure the success or failure of a medication or treatment plan. Lab tests may be ordered for professional or legal reasons. You may need this test if you have:
  • ABO incompatibility reaction
  • Rh incompatibility reaction

When and how often should I have this Coomb  test?

When and how often laboratory tests are done may depend on many factors. The timing of laboratory tests may rely on the results or completion of other tests, procedures, or treatments. Lab tests may be performed immediately in an emergency, or tests may be delayed as a condition is treated or monitored. A test may be suggested or become necessary when certain signs or symptoms appear. Due to changes in the way your body naturally functions through the course of a day, lab tests may need to be performed at a certain time of day. If you have prepared for a test by changing your food or fluid intake, lab tests may be timed in accordance with those changes. Timing of tests may be based on increased and decreased levels of medications, drugs or other substances in the body. The age or gender of the person being tested may affect when and how often a lab test is required. Chronic or progressive conditions may need ongoing monitoring through the use of lab tests. Conditions that worsen and improve may also need frequent monitoring. Certain tests may be repeated to obtain a series of results, or tests may need to be repeated to confirm or disprove results. Timing and frequency of lab tests may vary if they are performed for professional or legal reasons.

How should I get ready for the Coomb  test?

Before having blood collected, tell the person drawing your blood if you are allergic to latex. Tell the healthcare worker if you have a medical condition or are using a medication or supplement that causes excessive bleeding. Also tell the healthcare worker if you have felt nauseated, lightheaded, or have fainted while having blood drawn in the past.

How is the test done?

When a blood sample from a vein is needed, a vein in your arm is usually selected. A tourniquet (large rubber strap) may be secured above the vein. The skin over the vein will be cleaned, and a needle will be inserted. You will be asked to hold very still while your blood is collected. Blood will be collected into one or more tubes, and the tourniquet will be removed. When enough blood has been collected, the healthcare worker will take the needle out.

How will the test feel?

The amount of discomfort you feel will depend on many factors, including your sensitivity to pain. Communicate how you are feeling with the person doing the test. Inform the person doing the test if you feel that you cannot continue with the test. During a blood draw, you may feel mild discomfort at the location where the blood sample is being collected.

What should I do after the test?

After a blood sample is collected from your vein, a bandage, cotton ball, or gauze may be placed on the area where the needle was inserted. You may be asked to apply pressure to the area. Avoid strenuous exercise immediately after your blood draw. Contact your healthcare worker if you feel pain or see redness, swelling, or discharge from the puncture site.

CPK(Geeatinine Phospo Kinase)

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CPK(Geeatinine Phospo Kinase) Serum 450 same day

A CPK isoenzymes test is usually done in the emergency room if you have the symptoms of a heart attack. Your doctor may order a CPK blood test to:
  • help them diagnose a heart attack
  • find the cause of your chest pain
  • find out how much heart or muscle tissue has been damaged
The test can also determine whether you carry the gene for muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a group of diseases that causes muscle loss and weakness over time. A CPK isoenzymes test can detect various muscle diseases or issues, including:
  • dermatomyositis, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the skin and muscles
  • polymyositis, which is an inflammatory disease that causes muscle weakness
  • malignant hyperthermia, which is an inherited disease that causes muscle contractions
  • other conditions that may cause muscle breakdown, such as over-exercising, certain medications, or prolonged seizures.

How do I prepare for a CPK test?

The CPK isoenzymes test is similar to other blood tests. It doesn’t require any fasting or special preparation. Before you schedule your blood test, it’s important to tell your doctor about any over-the-counter and prescription medications you’re taking. Some substances can cause elevated CPK, including:
  • drugs that lower cholesterol
  • steroids
  • anesthetics
  • amphotericin B, which is an antifungal medication
  • alcohol
  • cocaine
Other factors may cause elevated test results, including:
  • vigorous exercise
  • recent surgery
  • intramuscular injections, such as vaccines
  • cardiac catheterization, which is when a catheter is inserted into a vein in your arm, groin, or neck and threaded to your heart
Make sure to tell your doctor if you’ve recently experienced any of these events.

Creatine Test

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CRCT CRC 250 On Next day

A creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. Creatinine is a waste product that forms when creatine, which is found in your muscle, breaks down. Creatinine levels in the blood can provide your doctor with information about how well your kidneys are working. Each kidney has millions of small blood-filtering units called nephrons. The nephrons constantly filter blood through a very tiny cluster of blood vessels known as glomeruli. These structures filter waste products, excess water, and other impurities out of the blood. The toxins are stored in the bladder and then removed during urination. Creatine test is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Creatinine is one of the substances that your kidneys normally eliminate from the body. Doctors measure the level of creatinine in the blood to check kidney function. High levels of creatinine may indicate that your kidney is damaged and not working properly. Creatinine blood tests are usually performed along with several other laboratory tests, including a blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test and a basic metabolic panel (BMP) or comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). These tests are done during routine physical exams to help diagnose certain diseases and to check for any problems with your kidney function.

Why is a creatinine blood test done?

Your doctor may order a creatinine blood test to assess your creatinine levels if you show signs of kidney disease. These symptoms include:
  • fatigue and trouble sleeping
  • a loss of appetite
  • swelling in the face, wrists, ankles, or abdomen
  • lower back pain near the kidneys
  • changes in urine output and frequency
  • high blood pressure
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Kidney problems can be related to different diseases or conditions, including:

  • glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the glomeruli due to damage
  • pyelonephritis, which is a bacterial infection of the kidneys
  • prostate disease, such as an enlarged prostate
  • blockage of the urinary tract, which may be due to kidney stones
  • decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which may be caused by congestive heart failure, diabetes, or dehydration
  • the death of kidney cells as a result of drug abuse
  • streptococcal infections, such as poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis
Aminoglycoside medications, such as gentamicin (Garamycin, Gentasol), can also cause kidney damage in some people. If you’re taking this type of medication, your doctor may order regular creatinine blood tests to make sure your kidneys remain healthy.

Creatine Test2

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CRCTS CRCS 250 On Next day

A creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. Creatinine is a waste product that forms when creatine, which is found in your muscle, breaks down. Creatinine levels in the blood can provide your doctor with information about how well your kidneys are working. Each kidney has millions of small blood-filtering units called nephrons. The nephrons constantly filter blood through a very tiny cluster of blood vessels known as glomeruli. These structures filter waste products, excess water, and other impurities out of the blood. The toxins are stored in the bladder and then removed during urination. Creatine  test is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Creatinine is one of the substances that your kidneys normally eliminate from the body. Doctors measure the level of creatinine in the blood to check kidney function. High levels of creatinine may indicate that your kidney is damaged and not working properly. Creatinine blood tests are usually performed along with several other laboratory tests, including a blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test and a basic metabolic panel (BMP) or comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). These tests are done during routine physical exams to help diagnose certain diseases and to check for any problems with your kidney function.

Why is a creatinine blood test done?

Your doctor may order a creatinine blood test to assess your creatinine levels if you show signs of kidney disease. These symptoms include:
  • fatigue and trouble sleeping
  • a loss of appetite
  • swelling in the face, wrists, ankles, or abdomen
  • lower back pain near the kidneys
  • changes in urine output and frequency
  • high blood pressure
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Kidney problems can be related to different diseases or conditions, including:

  • glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the glomeruli due to damage
  • pyelonephritis, which is a bacterial infection of the kidneys
  • prostate disease, such as an enlarged prostate
  • blockage of the urinary tract, which may be due to kidney stones
  • decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which may be caused by congestive heart failure, diabetes, or dehydration
  • the death of kidney cells as a result of drug abuse
  • streptococcal infections, such as poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis
Aminoglycoside medications, such as gentamicin (Garamycin, Gentasol), can also cause kidney damage in some people. If you’re taking this type of medication, your doctor may order regular creatinine blood tests to make sure your kidneys remain healthy.

Creatinine , Urine

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Creatinine , Urine Random Urine/ 24hrs Urine 100 same day

Creatinine is a chemical waste product produced by muscle metabolism. When your kidneys are functioning normally, they filter creatinine and other waste products out of your blood. These waste products are removed from your body through urination. A creatinine urine test measures the amount of creatinine in your urine. The test can help your doctor evaluate how well your kidneys are functioning. This is useful for diagnosing or ruling out kidney disease and other conditions affecting the kidneys. Your doctor may use a random urine sample to test for creatinine. However, they’ll order a urine 24-hour volume test in most cases. Although one sample of urine can be tested for creatinine, it’s more accurate to collect the urine for a whole day to get that value. The creatinine in your urine can vary a lot based on diet, exercise, and hydration levels, so a spot check is not as helpful. As the name suggests, this creatinine urine test measures the amount of urine produced in a day. It isn’t a painful test, and there aren’t any risks associated with it.
How do I prepare for the 24-hour volume test?
The 24-hour volume test is noninvasive and involves only the collection of urine. You’ll be given one or more containers for collecting and storing urine. Since this test involves collecting and storing urine for a 24-hour period, you may want to consider scheduling the test for a day when you’re at home. Before the test, you should do the following:
  • Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or think you may be pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements or prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Some supplements and drugs can interfere with the test results. Your doctor can tell you which ones to avoid.
  • Avoid certain foods or beverages if advised by your doctor.
  • Ask your doctor if you need to begin the test at a particular time of day.
  • Make sure you understand when and where you should return the container of urine.

Creatinine blood

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Creatinine blood Serum 100 same day

A creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. Creatinine is a waste product that forms when creatine, which is found in your muscle, breaks down. Creatinine levels in the blood can provide your doctor with information about how well your kidneys are working. Each kidney has millions of small blood-filtering units called nephrons. The nephrons constantly filter blood through a very tiny cluster of blood vessels known as glomeruli. These structures filter waste products, excess water, and other impurities out of the blood. The toxins are stored in the bladder and then removed during urination. Creatinine blood is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Creatinine is one of the substances that your kidneys normally eliminate from the body. Doctors measure the level of creatinine in the blood to check kidney function. High levels of creatinine may indicate that your kidney is damaged and not working properly. Creatinine blood tests are usually performed along with several other laboratory tests, including a blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test and a basic metabolic panel (BMP) or comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). These tests are done during routine physical exams to help diagnose certain diseases and to check for any problems with your kidney function.

Why is a creatinine blood test done?

Your doctor may order a creatinine blood test to assess your creatinine levels if you show signs of kidney disease. These symptoms include:
  • fatigue and trouble sleeping
  • a loss of appetite
  • swelling in the face, wrists, ankles, or abdomen
  • lower back pain near the kidneys
  • changes in urine output and frequency
  • high blood pressure
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Kidney problems can be related to different diseases or conditions, including:

  • glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the glomeruli due to damage
  • pyelonephritis, which is a bacterial infection of the kidneys
  • prostate disease, such as an enlarged prostate
  • blockage of the urinary tract, which may be due to kidney stones
  • decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which may be caused by congestive heart failure, diabetes, or dehydration
  • the death of kidney cells as a result of drug abuse
  • streptococcal infections, such as poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis
Aminoglycoside medications, such as gentamicin (Garamycin, Gentasol), can also cause kidney damage in some people. If you’re taking this type of medication, your doctor may order regular creatinine blood tests to make sure your kidneys remain healthy.

Creatinine blood

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Creatinine blood Serum 100 same day

A creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. Creatinine is a waste product that forms when creatine, which is found in your muscle, breaks down. Creatinine levels in the blood can provide your doctor with information about how well your kidneys are working. Each kidney has millions of small blood-filtering units called nephrons. The nephrons constantly filter blood through a very tiny cluster of blood vessels known as glomeruli. These structures filter waste products, excess water, and other impurities out of the blood. The toxins are stored in the bladder and then removed during urination. Creatinine blood is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly Creatinine is one of the substances that your kidneys normally eliminate from the body. Doctors measure the level of creatinine in the blood to check kidney function. High levels of creatinine may indicate that your kidney is damaged and not working properly. Creatinine blood tests are usually performed along with several other laboratory tests, including a blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test and a basic metabolic panel (BMP) or comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). These tests are done during routine physical exams to help diagnose certain diseases and to check for any problems with your kidney function.

Why is a creatinine blood test done?

Your doctor may order a creatinine blood test to assess your creatinine levels if you show signs of kidney disease. These symptoms include:
  • fatigue and trouble sleeping
  • a loss of appetite
  • swelling in the face, wrists, ankles, or abdomen
  • lower back pain near the kidneys
  • changes in urine output and frequency
  • high blood pressure
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Kidney problems can be related to different diseases or conditions, including:

  • glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the glomeruli due to damage
  • pyelonephritis, which is a bacterial infection of the kidneys
  • prostate disease, such as an enlarged prostate
  • blockage of the urinary tract, which may be due to kidney stones
  • decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which may be caused by congestive heart failure, diabetes, or dehydration
  • the death of kidney cells as a result of drug abuse
  • streptococcal infections, such as poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis
Aminoglycoside medications, such as gentamicin (Garamycin, Gentasol), can also cause kidney damage in some people. If you’re taking this type of medication, your doctor may order regular creatinine blood tests to make sure your kidneys remain healthy.

CRP (c-Reactive Protine) Quantitave

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CRP (c-Reactive Protine) Quantitave Serum 350 same day

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant, a protein made by the liver and released into the blood within a few hours after tissue injury, the start of an infection, or other cause of inflammation. Markedly increased levels are observed, for example, after trauma or a heart attack, with active or uncontrolled autoimmune disorders, and with serious bacterial infections like sepsis. The level of can jump as much as a thousand-fold in response to inflammatory conditions, and its rise in the blood can precede pain, fever, or other clinical indicators. The test measures the amount of CRP in the blood and can be valuable in detecting inflammation due to acute conditions or in monitoring disease activity in chronic conditions. The test is not diagnostic, but it provides information to a health practitioner as to whether inflammation is present. This information can be used in conjunction with other factors such as signs and symptoms, physical exam, and other tests to determine if someone has an acute inflammatory condition or is experiencing a flare-up of a chronic inflammatory disease. The health practitioner may then follow up with further testing and treatment. This standard test is not to be confused with an hs-CRP test. These are two different tests that measure CRP and each test measures a different range of level in the blood for different purposes:
  • The standard test measures markedly high levels of the protein to detect diseases that cause significant inflammation. It measures in the range from 10 to 1000 mg/L.
  • The hs-CRP test accurately detects lower levels of the protein than the standard CRP test and is used to evaluate individuals for risk of cardiovascular disease. It measures CRP in the range from 0.5 to 10 mg/L. (See the article on hs-CRP.)

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Cu ( Copper )

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Cu ( Copper ) Serum/ Random urine 460 6 Days

Copper is an essential mineral that the body incorporates into enzymes. These enzymes play a role in the regulation of iron metabolism, formation of connective tissue, energy production at the cellular level, the production of melanin (the pigment that produces skin color), and the function of the nervous system. This test measures the amount of Cu in the blood, urine, or liver (hepatic). Copper is found in many foods including nuts, chocolate, mushrooms, shellfish, whole grains, dried fruits, and liver. Drinking water may acquire Cu as it flows through Cu pipes, and food may acquire it when people cook or serve food in copper dishes. Normally, the body absorbs copper from food or liquids in the intestines, converts it to a non-toxic form by binding it to a protein, and transports it to the liver. The liver stores some of the copper and binds most of the rest to another protein called apoceruloplasmin to produce the enzyme ceruloplasmin. About 95% of the copper in the blood is bound to ceruloplasmin, and most of the rest is bound to other proteins such as albumin. Only a small amount is normally present in the blood in a free (unbound) state. The liver eliminates excess copper into the bile and it is removed from the body in the stool. Some copper is also eliminated in the urine. Both excess and deficiency of Cu are rare. Wilson disease, a rare inherited disorder, can lead to excess storage of Cu in the liver, brain, and other organs. Cu excess (toxicity) can also occur when a person is exposed to and absorbs large amounts over a short period of time (acute exposure) or various amounts over a long period (chronic exposure). Cu deficiency may occasionally occur in people who have conditions associated with severe malabsorption, such as cystic fibrosis and celiac disease, and in infants exclusively fed cow-milk formulas. A rare X-linked genetic condition called Menkes kinky hair syndrome leads to Cu deficiency in the brain and liver of affected infants. The disease, which affects primarily males, is associated with seizures, delayed development, abnormal artery development in the brain, and unusual gray brittle kinky hair.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm and/or a 24-hour urine sample is collected. Sometimes a health practitioner performs a liver biopsy.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed

Culture for KLB, Diphtheria

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Culture for KLB, Diphtheria Throat/NASAL Swab 470 5 Days

The Diphtheria Culture test is used to detect the presence of the bacteria called Corynebacterium diphtherias. This test is used when a disease called diphtheria is suspected. Diphtherias is a serious, frequently fatal, bacterial infection that affects the respiratory tract. These bacteria may be found in the throat, nose, and skin. Clinical specimens for culture are taken from the nose or nasopharynx, and throat from all persons with suspected cases and their close contacts. Swabs are also taken from beneath the membrane, or a piece of the membrane is removed. Specimens for culture are obtained as soon as diphtheria is suspected.

Preparation For The Test

Patients should make sure that they do not use any antiseptic mouthwash before undergoing the test. Patients need to inform the doctor if he/she is under any antibiotic as this could affect the tests sometime. The patient should not gargle immediately before the throat culture. The patient’s immunization history is also checked before the process starts.

Use Of The Test

This test enables the doctors to determine the possibility of the presence of the bacteria C diphtheriaes which causes diphtheria When diphtheria bacilli are isolated they are tested for the presence of the toxin producing gene. The toxigenicity tests of C diphtheriaes is further performed determined by a variety of in vitro and in vivo tests. Diphtherias is a serious bacterial infection that affects the mucous membranes of the throat and nose. Although it spreads easily from one person to another, diphtheria can be prevented through the use of vaccines.

DC ( Differential Count)

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DC ( Differential Count) EDTA Blood/ Slides Smear 40 same day

The test is a complete blood routine test carried out to measure the levels of different components of the blood. The test measures Hb (Hemoglobin), TC (Total count), DC (Differential count), and ESR(Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate). It gives information about the general health of a person. TC or total count measures the number of WBCs or white blood cells, which if high in number are indicative of an infection. DC measures the structure and consistency of WBCs and counts the percentage of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. ESR levels check for inflammation in the body. Hb measures the number of red blood cells in the blood. TC,DC,Hb% & MP is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

Preperation For The Test Tc,Dc,ESR & Hb%

No special preparation is required for the test. The doctor should be informed of prior medical history and medications being taken and existing allergies, for specific instructions.

 The use of The Test Tc,Dc,ESR & Hb%

The normal levels of the different components of the blood are as follows: TC : 4000-11000/cu.mm DC (in %): Neutrophils – 40-70 Basophils – 0-1 Eosinophils – 1-6 Monocytes – 2-10 Lymphocytes – 20-45 Higher levels of DC and TC are indicative of cancers such as leukemia. Hemoglobin (in %): 11-16. Low levels of Hb are indicative of sickle cell anemia. ESR (in %): 2-16. High levels of ESR can be indicative of an auto-immune disease, tuberculosis, thyroid disease or other infections, while low levels of ESR are indicative of diseases such as sickle cell anemia and congestive heart failure. The levels of these components should be corresponded with the levels of other components of the blood to get a clearer picture of the disease being indicated. The test is a complete blood routine test carried out to measure the levels of different components of the blood. The test measures Hb (Hemoglobin), TC (Total count), DC (Differential count), and ESR(Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) along with MP test is performed on a sample of blood to measure the level of WBC Total Count, Neutrophils, Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Basophils, Eosinophils, RBC Count, HCT, Hb, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Mean Platelet Volume, Platelet Count and MP in the blood.It is performed to detect Malaria. It gives information about the general health of a person. TC or total count measures the number of WBCs or white blood cells, which if high in number are indicative of an infection. DC measures the structure and consistency of WBCs and counts the percentage of eosinophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. ESR levels check for inflammation in the body. Hb measures the number of red blood cells in the blood and MP test  to detect the Malaria Parasite.

DC. MP

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DC. MP EDTA Blood/ Slides Smear 120 same day

The test is a complete blood routine test carried out to measure the levels of different components of the blood. The test measures Hb (Hemoglobin), TC (Total count), DC (Differential count), and ESR(Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate). It gives information about the general health of a person. TC or total count measures the number of WBCs or white blood cells, which if high in number are indicative of an infection. DC measures the structure and consistency of WBCs and counts the percentage of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. ESR levels check for inflammation in the body. Hb measures the number of red blood cells in the blood. TC,DC,Hb% & MP is done very accurately at GoodDays Diagnostic Center at Chinsurah, Hooghly

Preperation For The Test Tc,Dc,ESR & Hb%

No special preparation is required for the test. The doctor should be informed of prior medical history and medications being taken and existing allergies, for specific instructions.

 The use of The Test Tc,Dc,ESR & Hb%

The normal levels of the different components of the blood are as follows: TC : 4000-11000/cu.mm DC (in %): Neutrophils – 40-70 Basophils – 0-1 Eosinophils – 1-6 Monocytes – 2-10 Lymphocytes – 20-45 Higher levels of DC and TC are indicative of cancers such as leukemia. Hemoglobin (in %): 11-16. Low levels of Hb are indicative of sickle cell anemia. ESR (in %): 2-16. High levels of ESR can be indicative of an auto-immune disease, tuberculosis, thyroid disease or other infections, while low levels of ESR are indicative of diseases such as sickle cell anemia and congestive heart failure. The levels of these components should be corresponded with the levels of other components of the blood to get a clearer picture of the disease being indicated. The test is a complete blood routine test carried out to measure the levels of different components of the blood. The test measures Hb (Hemoglobin), TC (Total count), DC (Differential count), and ESR(Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) along with MP test is performed on a sample of blood to measure the level of WBC Total Count, Neutrophils, Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Basophils, Eosinophils, RBC Count, HCT, Hb, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Mean Platelet Volume, Platelet Count and MP in the blood.It is performed to detect Malaria. It gives information about the general health of a person. TC or total count measures the number of WBCs or white blood cells, which if high in number are indicative of an infection. DC measures the structure and consistency of WBCs and counts the percentage of eosinophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. ESR levels check for inflammation in the body. Hb measures the number of red blood cells in the blood and MP test  to detect the Malaria Parasite.

Dengue Anti bodies IgG & IgM NS1 ( Rapid Method)

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Dengue Anti bodies IgG & IgM NS1 Serum 1100 Same Day

Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted to humans by mosquitoes that live in tropical and subtropical climates and carry the virus. Blood testing detects the dengue virus or antibodies produced in response to dengue infection. Many individuals will develop no symptoms at all, or have only a mild illness when exposed to one of the four serotypes (1-4) of the dengue virus. For those who do develop symptoms, prognosis is still very good for full recovery within a few weeks. The most common initial symptoms are a sudden high fever (104°F or 40°C) and flu-like symptoms that appear roughly 4 to 7 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito (this is called the incubation period and can range from 3 to 14 days). Additional signs and symptoms may include severe headache, especially behind the eyes, muscle and joint pain, skin rash, nausea, vomiting, and swollen glands. Some people who develop a fever will recover on their own with no lasting ill effects while others may progress to severe dengue fever (sometimes called Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever). If the disease progresses to this form, a new wave of symptoms will appear 3 to 7 days after initial symptoms and as the fever recedes. These may include nose bleeds, vomiting blood, passing blood in the stool, difficulty breathing and cold clammy skin, especially in the extremities. During the second phase, the virus may attack blood vessels (the vascular system), causing capillaries to leak fluid into the space around the lungs (pleural effusion) or into the abdominal cavity (ascites). The loss of blood and fluid during the second phase, if untreated, can worsen and can be fatal. In order to avoid that complication (sometimes called Dengue Shock Syndrome), a healthcare practitioner may hospitalize a patient with severe dengue fever so that falling blood pressure and dehydration caused by the loss of blood and fluids can be managed while the disease runs its course – generally a period of one to two weeks. During the following week of recovery, a person may develop a second rash that lasts a week or more. Dengue fever is usually diagnosed via some combination of blood tests because the body's immune response to the virus is dynamic and complex. Laboratory tests may include:
  • Molecular tests for dengue virus (PCR)—detect the presence of the virus itself; these tests can diagnose dengue fever up to 7 days after the onset of symptoms and can be used to determine which of the 4 different serotypes of dengue virus is causing the infection.
  • Antibody tests, IgM and IgG—detect antibodies produced by the immune system when a person has been exposed to the virus; these tests are most effective when performed at least 4 days after exposure.
  • Complete blood count (CBC)—to look for low platelet count typical of the later stages of the illness and to detect the decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell (RBC) count (evidence of anemia) that would occur with blood loss associated with severe dengue fever
  • Basic metabolic panel (BMP) – to monitor kidney function and look for evidence of dehydration that can occur with severe illness

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is collected by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

Dengue Anti bodies IgG & IgM NS1 (Elisa )

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Dengue Anti bodies IgG & IgM NS1 (Elisa ) Serum 1600 2 Days

Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted to humans by mosquitoes that live in tropical and subtropical climates and carry the virus. Blood testing detects the dengue virus or antibodies produced in response to dengue infection. Many individuals will develop no symptoms at all, or have only a mild illness when exposed to one of the four serotypes (1-4) of the dengue virus. For those who do develop symptoms, prognosis is still very good for full recovery within a few weeks. The most common initial symptoms are a sudden high fever (104°F or 40°C) and flu-like symptoms that appear roughly 4 to 7 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito (this is called the incubation period and can range from 3 to 14 days). Additional signs and symptoms may include severe headache, especially behind the eyes, muscle and joint pain, skin rash, nausea, vomiting, and swollen glands. Some people who develop a fever will recover on their own with no lasting ill effects while others may progress to severe dengue fever (sometimes called Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever). If the disease progresses to this form, a new wave of symptoms will appear 3 to 7 days after initial symptoms and as the fever recedes. These may include nose bleeds, vomiting blood, passing blood in the stool, difficulty breathing and cold clammy skin, especially in the extremities. During the second phase, the virus may attack blood vessels (the vascular system), causing capillaries to leak fluid into the space around the lungs (pleural effusion) or into the abdominal cavity (ascites). The loss of blood and fluid during the second phase, if untreated, can worsen and can be fatal. In order to avoid that complication (sometimes called Dengue Shock Syndrome), a healthcare practitioner may hospitalize a patient with severe dengue fever so that falling blood pressure and dehydration caused by the loss of blood and fluids can be managed while the disease runs its course – generally a period of one to two weeks. During the following week of recovery, a person may develop a second rash that lasts a week or more. Dengue fever is usually diagnosed via some combination of blood tests because the body's immune response to the virus is dynamic and complex. Laboratory tests may include:
  • Molecular tests for dengue virus (PCR)—detect the presence of the virus itself; these tests can diagnose dengue fever up to 7 days after the onset of symptoms and can be used to determine which of the 4 different serotypes of dengue virus is causing the infection.
  • Antibody tests, IgM and IgG—detect antibodies produced by the immune system when a person has been exposed to the virus; these tests are most effective when performed at least 4 days after exposure.
  • Complete blood count (CBC)—to look for low platelet count typical of the later stages of the illness and to detect the decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell (RBC) count (evidence of anemia) that would occur with blood loss associated with severe dengue fever
  • Basic metabolic panel (BMP) – to monitor kidney function and look for evidence of dehydration that can occur with severe illness

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is collected by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

DOUBLE MARKER TEST

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DOUBLE MARKER TEST Serum, prescription and usg report, dob,weight, height,lmp date 2800 7 Days

The double marker test is suggested for a pregnant women above 35 years of age who carry a high risk of delivering a child with Down's syndrome. However, it is recommended even for younger age women. This test helps in the detection of pre-birth conditions of the fetus and is usually done after 8 weeks of pregnancy up to 14 weeks. This test detects any

kind of chromosomal abnormalities that might occur after the conception occurs. Doctor may recommend ultra sound test first, based on the results of ultra-sound test he may suggest for this Double Market test. This test is usually suggested by doctors to pregnant women above 35 years, a family history of birth defects, previous child born with birth defects, History of insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes.

 Preparation For The Test

There is no preparation required by the patients to undergo this test. However, if there is any medication taken by the patient it is advisable that the patient informs the doctor. It is a simple blood test which is done on the patient.

 Use of The Test

This test helps us to know whether a baby is at risk for Mental Disorders. This test primarily detects Down's syndrome (babies have an extra chromosome number 21 (3 chromosome 21 instead of normal 2 chromosome 21) This test helps to detect Trisomy 18, which cause mental retardation and severe birth defects. This test helps to detect trisomy 21.T, which cause mental disorders, heart disorders and other health issues impacting vital organs. These three disorders are because of chromosomal defects and could cause serious problems. This test is available in all developing countries, and should not be ignored. It is for the safety and hassle free baby.
 

DSDNA ANTI

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DSDNA ANTI Serum 500

Anti-double stranded DNA antibody (antis-dsDNA) is one of a group of auto antibodies called antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Normally, antibodies protect against infection, but autoantibodies are produced when a person's immune system fails to adequately distinguish between "self" and "non-self." They mistakenly attack the body's own healthy cells, causing tissue and organ damage. Antis-dsDNA specifically targets the genetic material (DNA) found in the nucleus of a cell, hence the name "antis-dsDNA." The anti-dsDNA test identifies the presence of these autoantibodies in the blood. While anti-dsDNA may be present at a low level with a number of disorders, it is primarily associated with lupus. Lupus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that can affect various tissues and/or organs of the body such as the kidneys, joints, blood vessels, skin, heart, lungs, and the brain. (For more on this, read the article on Lupus). The test for anti-dsDNA, along with other autoantibody tests, may be used to help establish a diagnosis of lupus and distinguish it from other autoimmune disorders. One serious complication of lupus is lupus nephritis, a condition characterized by inflammation of the kidneys, which can lead to protein in the urine, high blood pressure, and kidney failure. It occurs when the autoantibodies bind to antigens and become deposited in the kidneys. In the evaluation of someone with lupus nephritis, a high level (titer) of anti-dsDNA is generally associated with ongoing inflammation and damage to the kidneys.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

E.C.G.

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E.C.G. 180 Same day

The electrocardiogram (E.C.G.or EKG) is a diagnostic tool that is routinely used to assess the electrical and muscular functions of the heart. While it is a relatively simple test to perform, the interpretation of the E.C.G.tracing requires significant amounts of training. Numerous textbooks are devoted to the subject. The heart is a two stage electrical pump and the heart's electrical activity can be measured by electrodes placed on the skin. The electrocardiogram can measure the rate and rhythm of the heartbeat, as well as provide indirect evidence of blood flow to the heart muscle. A standardized system has been developed for the electrode placement for a routine E.C.G.. Ten electrodes are needed to produce 12 electrical views of the heart. An electrode lead, or patch, is placed on each arm and leg and six are placed across the chest wall. The signals received from each electrode are recorded. The printed view of these recordings is the electrocardiogram. By comparison, a heart monitor requires only three electrode leads – one each on the right arm, left arm, and left chest. It only measures the rate and rhythm of the heartbeat. This kind of monitoring does not constitute a complete ECG. The heart has four chambers – the right and left atrium and the right and left ventricle. The right side of the heart collects blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs while the left side of the heart receives blood from the lungs and pumps it to the body. Blood flows through the body in the following way:
  • Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs enters the left atrium through the pulmonary veins.
  • Blood then flows into the left ventricle where it is pumped into the aorta and is distributed to the rest of the body. This blood supplies organs and cells with oxygen and nutrients necessary for metabolism.
  • Blood that returns to the heart is depleted of oxygen and carries carbon dioxide, the waste product of metabolism. The blood enters the right atrium though the vena cava, where it is collected and pumped to the right ventricle.
  • The right ventricle then pumps blood through the pulmonary artery to the lungs where carbon dioxide is stripped off, oxygen is replaced, and the cycle begins again.
Picture of heart anatomy blood flow
Like any muscle, the heart requires oxygen and nutrients to function. Oxygen and nutrients are supplied by arteries that originate from the aorta. These vessels branch out to supply all the regions of the heart with oxygen rich blood. Electrically, the heart can be divided into upper and lower chambers. An electrical impulse is generated in the upper chambers of the heart that causes the atria to squeeze and push blood into the ventricles. There is a short delay to allow the ventricles to fill. The ventricles then contract to pump blood to the body and the lungs. Conducting system of the heart: SA means sinoatrial node. AV means atrioventricular node. RB and LB mean right and left bundle, respectively, and are the nerves that spread the electric impulse from the AV node into the ventricles. The heart has its own automatic pacemaker called the sinaoatrial, or SA node, located in the right atrium. The SA node acts independently of the brain to generate electricity for the heart to beat.
  • Normally, the impulse generated by the SA node runs through the heart's electrical grid and signals the muscle cells in the atria to beat simultaneously, allowing for a coordinated squeeze of the heart. Contraction of the atria pushes blood into the ventricles.
  • The electrical signal that was generated in the SA node travels to a junction box between the atria and ventricles (the AV node) where it is delayed for a few milliseconds to allow the ventricles to fill.
  • The electrical signal then travels through the ventricles, stimulating those heart muscle cells to contract. Ventricular contraction pumps blood to the body (from the left ventricle) and the lungs (from the right ventricle).
  • There is a short pause to allow blood to return to the heart and fill before the electrical cycle repeats itself for the next heartbeat.

E2 ( Estradiol/Estrogen)

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E2 ( Estradiol/Estrogen) Serum 700 Same Day

An estradiol test measures the amount of the hormone estradiol in your blood. It’s also called an E2 test. Estradiol is a form of the hormone estrogen. It’s also called 17 beta-estradiol. The ovaries, breasts, and adrenal glands make Estrogen. During pregnancy, the placenta also makes Estrogen. Estrogen helps with the growth and development of female sex organs, including the:
  • uterus
  • fallopian tubes
  • vagina
  • breasts
Estrogen helps to control the way fat is distributed in the female body. It’s also essential for bone and joint health in females. Males also have estradiol in their bodies. Their levels of estradiol are lower than the levels in females. In males, the adrenal glands and testes make estradiol. Estrogen has been shown in vitro to prevent destruction of sperm cells, but its clinical importance in sexual function and development in men is likely less significant than in women.

Why do I need an estradiol test?

Your doctor may order an Estrogen test if female or male sex characteristics aren’t developing at the normal rate. An Estrogen level that’s higher than normal indicates that puberty is happening earlier than usual. This is a condition known as precocious puberty.

Lower levels of Estrogen may indicate late puberty. The test can help your doctor find out if there are problems with your adrenal glands. It can also help determine if treatment for hypopituitarism, or decreased function of the pituitary gland, is working. Your doctor may order Estrogen testing to look for causes of:
  • abnormal menstrual periods
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • infertility in women
Your doctor may also order an Estrogen test if your menstrual cycle has stopped and you’re having symptoms of menopause. During and after menopause, a woman’s body will gradually produce less estrogen and Estrogen, contributing to the symptoms experienced during menopause. A test of your Estrogen level can help your doctor determine if you’re preparing to enter menopause or you’re already going through the transition. The Estrogen test can also indicate how well the ovaries are working. Therefore, your doctor may also order this test if you have symptoms of an ovarian tumor. The symptoms include:
  • bloating or swelling in your abdomen
  • trouble eating due to feeling full after eating a small amount of food
  • pain in your lower abdominal and pelvic area
  • weight loss
  • frequent urination
If you’re pregnant or you’re on infertility treatments, your doctor may order an Estrogen test to help keep track of your progress. An Estrogen test usually isn’t used alone to make a diagnosis. However, the results of this test may help your doctor decide if further testing is necessary. People undergoing transgender hormone therapy may receive Estrogen. If so, their Estrogenlevels may be regularly tested and monitored by their doctors.

Electrolytes Panel ( Na+, K+, Cl- & HCO3)

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Eleetrolytes Panel ( Na+, K+, Cl- & HCO3) Serum 600 Same Day

Electrolytes are minerals that are found in body tissues and blood in the form of dissolved salts. As electrically charged particles, electrolytes help move nutrients into and wastes out of the body's cells, maintain a healthy water balance, and help stabilize the body's acid/base (pH) level. The electrolyte panel measures the blood levels of the main electrolytes in the body: sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), chloride (Cl-), and bicarbonate (HCO3-; sometimes reported as total CO2). A person's diet provides sodium, potassium, and chloride. The kidneys help maintain proper levels by reabsorption or by elimination into the urine. The lungs provide oxygen and regulate CO2. The CO2 is produced by the body and is in balance with bicarbonate. The overall balance of these chemicals is an indication of the functional well-being of several basic body functions. They are important in maintaining a wide range of body functions, including cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction and nerve impulse conduction. Any disease or condition that affects the amount of fluid in the body, such as dehydration, or affects the lungs, kidneys, metabolism, or breathing has the potential to cause a fluid, electrolyte, or pH imbalance (acidosis or alkalosis). Normal pH must be maintained within a narrow range of 7.35-7.45 and electrolytes must be in balance to ensure the proper functioning of metabolic processes and the delivery of the right amount of oxygen to tissues. (For more on this, see the condition article on Acidosis and Alkalosis and also on Dehydration.) A related "test" is the anion gap, which is a value calculated using the results of an electrolyte panel. It reflects the difference between the positively charged ions (called cations) and the negatively charged ions (called anions). An abnormal anion gap is non-specific but can suggest certain kinds of metabolic or respiratory disorders or the presence of toxic substances. For more information on anion gap.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is drawn by needle from a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

ESR ( Erythrocyte Sedinoation rate)

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ESR EDTA Blood 40 Same Day

An erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test is sometimes called a sedimentation rate test or sed rate test. This test doesn’t diagnose one specific condition. Instead, it helps your doctor determine whether you’re experiencing inflammation. The doctor will look at ESR results along with other information or test results to help figure out a diagnosis. The tests ordered will depend on your symptoms. This test can also monitor inflammatory diseases. In this test, a tall, thin tube holds a sample of your blood. The speed at which the red blood cells fall to the bottom of the tube is measured. Inflammation can cause abnormal proteins to appear in your blood. These proteins cause your red blood cells to clump together. This makes them fall more quickly.

Why Doctors Perform an Erythrocyte Sedinoation rateTest

Your doctor may order an Erythrocyte Sedinoation rate test to help detect inflammation in your body. This can be useful in diagnosing conditions that cause inflammation, such as autoimmune diseases, cancers, and infections. An Erythrocyte Sedinoation rate test can monitor inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. Your doctor might also order this test if you’re experiencing fevers, some types of arthritis, or certain muscle problems. The ESR test is rarely performed alone. Instead, your doctor will combine it with other tests to determine the cause of your symptoms.

Preparing for the Erythrocyte Sedinoation rate Test

Many different medications and drugs affect your ESR test results. These include:
  • androgens, such as testosterone
  • estrogens
  • aspirin or other salicylates, when taken in high doses
  • valproic acid (Depakene)
  • divalproex sodium (Depakote)
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • heroin
  • methadone
  • phenothiazines
  • prednisone
 

F-PSA ( Free Prootate Specific Antigen)

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F-PSA ( Free Prootate Specific Antigen) Serum 600 10 Days

A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test measures the level of Prootate Specific Antigen in a man’s blood. PSA is a protein produced by the cells of your prostate, a small gland just underneath your bladder. Prootate Specific Antigen circulates through your entire body at low levels at all times.

A Prootate Specific Antigen test is sensitive and can detect higher-than-average levels of Prootate Specific Antigen. High levels of Prootate Specific Antigenmay be associated with prostate cancer before any physical symptoms appear. However, high levels of PSA may also mean you have a noncancerous condition that’s increasing your PSA levels.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States, other than non-melanoma skin cancer. A Prootate Specific Antigen test alone doesn’t provide enough information for your doctor to make a diagnosis. However, your doctor can take the results of a Prootate Specific Antigen test into consideration when trying to decide whether your symptoms and test results are due to cancer or another condition.

Why Is a PSA Test Needed?

According to the CDC, prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in American men. All men are at risk of the disease, but a few populations are more likely to develop it. These include:

  • older men
  • African-American men
  • men with a family history of prostate cancer

Your doctor may recommend a Prootate Specific Antigentest to screen for early signs of prostate cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, you doctor can also use a digital rectal exam to check for growths. In this exam, they’ll place a gloved finger into your rectum to feel your prostate.

In addition to testing for prostate cancer, your doctor may also order a PSA test:

  • to determine what’s causing a physical abnormality on your prostate found during a physical exam
  • to help decide when to begin treatment, if you’ve been diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • to monitor your prostate cancer treatment

F-T3 (Free Tri-iodothyronine)

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F-T3 (Free Tri-iodothyronine) Serum 400 2 Days

Triiodothyronine (T3) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called thyroxine (T4) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T3 (and T4) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. Tests can measure the amount of free Triiodothyronine or the total Triiodothyronine (bound plus unbound) in the blood. Triiodothyronine and T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When blood levels of thyroid hormones decline, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and/or release more thyroid hormones. Most of the thyroid hormone produced is T4. This hormone is relatively inactive, but it is converted into the much more active Triiodothyronine in the liver and other tissues. If the thyroid gland produces excessive amounts of T4 and Triiodothyronine , then the person affected may have symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, tremors of the hands, weight loss, insomnia, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. In some cases, the person's eyes cannot move normally and they may appear to be staring. In other cases, the eyes may appear to bulge. If the thyroid gland produces insufficient amounts of thyroid hormones, then the person may have signs and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and a slowed metabolism, such as weight gain, dry skin, fatigue, and constipation. The blood levels of thyroid hormones may be low or high due to thyroid dysfunction or rarely due to insufficient or excessive TSH production related to a pituitary disorder. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism, but it can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T3 or sometimes total T3.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free or total T3 test, so tell the health practitioner about any drugs being taken.

F-T3, FT4,TSH

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F-T3, FT4,TSH Serum 500 Next day

Triiodothyronine (T3) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called thyroxine (T4) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T3 (and T4) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. Tests can measure the amount of free T3 or the total T3 (bound plus unbound) in the blood. T3 and T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When blood levels of thyroid hormones decline, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and/or release more thyroid hormones. Most of the thyroid hormone produced is T4. This hormone is relatively inactive, but it is converted into the much more active T3 in the liver and other tissues. If the thyroid gland produces excessive amounts of T4 and T3, then the person affected may have symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, tremors of the hands, weight loss, insomnia, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. In some cases, the person's eyes cannot move normally and they may appear to be staring. In other cases, the eyes may appear to bulge. If the thyroid gland produces insufficient amounts of thyroid hormones, then the person may have signs and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and a slowed metabolism, such as weight gain, dry skin, fatigue, and constipation. The blood levels of thyroid hormones may be low or high due to thyroid dysfunction or rarely due to insufficient or excessive TSH production related to a pituitary disorder. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism, but it can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T3 or sometimes total T3.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free or total T3 test, so tell the health practitioner about any drugs being taken. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the pituitary gland, a tiny organ located below the brain and behind the sinus cavities. TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to release the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) into the blood. These thyroid hormones help control the rate at which the body uses energy. This test measures the amount of TSH in the blood. TSH, along with its regulatory hormone thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), which comes from the hypothalamus, is part of the feedback system that the body uses to maintain stable amounts of thyroid hormones in the blood. When thyroid hormone concentrations decrease, the production of TSH by the pituitary gland is increased. TSH in turn stimulates the production and release of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat flat against the windpipe. When all three organs are functioning normally, thyroid production turns on and off to maintain relatively stable levels of thyroid hormones in the blood. If the thyroid releases inappropriately large amounts of T4 and T3, the affected person may experience symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as rapid heart rate, weight loss, nervousness, hand tremors, irritated eyes, and difficulty sleeping. Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which the affected person's immune system produces antibodies that act like TSH, leading to the production of excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. In response, the pituitary may produce less TSH, usually leading to a low level in the blood. If there is decreased production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid (hypothyroidism), the person may experience symptoms such as weight gain, dry skin, constipation, cold intolerance, and fatigue. Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the U.S. It is a chronic autoimmune condition in which the immune response causes inflammation and damage to the thyroid as well as the production of autoantibodies. With Hashimoto thyroiditis, the thyroid produces low levels of thyroid hormone. The pituitary may produce more TSH, usually resulting in a high level in the blood. However, the level of TSH does not always predict or reflect thyroid hormone levels. Some people produce an abnormal form of TSH that does not function properly. They often have hypothyroidism despite having normal or even mildly elevated TSH levels. In a variety of thyroid diseases, thyroid hormone levels may be high or low, regardless of the amount of TSH present in the blood. Rarely, pituitary dysfunction may result in increased or decreased amounts of TSH. In addition to pituitary dysfunction, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism can occur if there is a problem with the hypothalamus (insufficient or excessive TRH).

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm or from pricking the heel of an infant.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the TSH test, so tell your health practitioner about any drugs that you are taking. If you take thyroid hormone as treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample be drawn before you take your dose for that day.

F-T3,F-T4

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F-T3,F-T4 Serum 600 Same day

Triiodothyronine (T3) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called thyroxine (T4) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T3 (and T4) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. Tests can measure the amount of free T3 or the total T3 (bound plus unbound) in the blood. T3 and T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When blood levels of thyroid hormones decline, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and/or release more thyroid hormones. Most of the thyroid hormone produced is T4. This hormone is relatively inactive, but it is converted into the much more active T3 in the liver and other tissues. If the thyroid gland produces excessive amounts of T4 and T3, then the person affected may have symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, tremors of the hands, weight loss, insomnia, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. In some cases, the person's eyes cannot move normally and they may appear to be staring. In other cases, the eyes may appear to bulge. If the thyroid gland produces insufficient amounts of thyroid hormones, then the person may have signs and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and a slowed metabolism, such as weight gain, dry skin, fatigue, and constipation. The blood levels of thyroid hormones may be low or high due to thyroid dysfunction or rarely due to insufficient or excessive TSH production related to a pituitary disorder. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism, but it can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T3 or sometimes total T3.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free or total T3 test, so tell the health practitioner about any drugs being taken.

F-T3' TSH

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F-T3' TSH Serum 550 Next day

Triiodothyronine (T3) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called thyroxine (T4) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T3 (and T4) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. Tests can measure the amount of free T3 or the total T3 (bound plus unbound) in the blood. T3 and T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When blood levels of thyroid hormones decline, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and/or release more thyroid hormones. Most of the thyroid hormone produced is T4. This hormone is relatively inactive, but it is converted into the much more active T3 in the liver and other tissues. If the thyroid gland produces excessive amounts of T4 and T3, then the person affected may have symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, tremors of the hands, weight loss, insomnia, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. In some cases, the person's eyes cannot move normally and they may appear to be staring. In other cases, the eyes may appear to bulge. If the thyroid gland produces insufficient amounts of thyroid hormones, then the person may have signs and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and a slowed metabolism, such as weight gain, dry skin, fatigue, and constipation. The blood levels of thyroid hormones may be low or high due to thyroid dysfunction or rarely due to insufficient or excessive TSH production related to a pituitary disorder. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism, but it can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T3 or sometimes total T3.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free or total T3 test, so tell the health practitioner about any drugs being taken.

F-T4 ( Free Thyroxine)

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F-T4 ( Free Thyroxine) Serum 400 2 Days

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called triiodothyronine (T3) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T4 (and T3) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. This test measures the amount of free T4 in the blood. T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When the level of T4 in the bloodstream decreases, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to make and/or release more T4. As the blood concentration of T4 increases, TSH release is inhibited. T4 makes up about 90% of thyroid hormones. When the body requires thyroid hormone, the thyroid gland releases stored T4 into circulation. In the blood, T4 is either free (not bound) or bound to protein (primarily bound to thyroxine-binding globulin). The concentration of free T4 is only about 0.1% of that of total T4. T4 is converted into T3 in the liver or other tissues. T3, like T4, is also mostly bound to protein, but it is the free forms of T3 and T4 that are biologically active. Free T3 is 4 to 5 times more active than free T4 in circulation. If the thyroid gland does not produce sufficient T4, due to thyroid dysfunction or to insufficient TSH, then the affected person experiences symptoms of hypothyroidism such as weight gain, dry skin, cold intolerance, irregular menstruation, and fatigue. Severe untreated hypothyroidism, called myxedema, can lead to heart failure, seizures, and coma. In children, hypothyroidism can stunt growth and delay sexual development. If the thyroid gland produces too much T4, the rate of the person's body functions will increase and cause symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism such as increased heart rate, anxiety, weight loss, difficulty sleeping, tremors in the hands, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto thyroiditis causes hypothyroidism. Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive or deficient production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T4.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm or from pricking the heel of an infant.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free T4 test, so tell your health practitioner about any drugs that you are taking. If you take thyroid hormone as treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample be drawn before you take your dose for that day. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the pituitary gland, a tiny organ located below the brain and behind the sinus cavities. TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to release the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) into the blood. These thyroid hormones help control the rate at which the body uses energy. This test measures the amount of TSH in the blood. TSH, along with its regulatory hormone thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), which comes from the hypothalamus, is part of the feedback system that the body uses to maintain stable amounts of thyroid hormones in the blood. When thyroid hormone concentrations decrease, the production of TSH by the pituitary gland is increased. TSH in turn stimulates the production and release of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat flat against the windpipe. When all three organs are functioning normally, thyroid production turns on and off to maintain relatively stable levels of thyroid hormones in the blood. If the thyroid releases inappropriately large amounts of T4 and T3, the affected person may experience symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as rapid heart rate, weight loss, nervousness, hand tremors, irritated eyes, and difficulty sleeping. Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which the affected person's immune system produces antibodies that act like TSH, leading to the production of excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. In response, the pituitary may produce less TSH, usually leading to a low level in the blood. If there is decreased production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid (hypothyroidism), the person may experience symptoms such as weight gain, dry skin, constipation, cold intolerance, and fatigue. Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the U.S. It is a chronic autoimmune condition in which the immune response causes inflammation and damage to the thyroid as well as the production of autoantibodies. With Hashimoto thyroiditis, the thyroid produces low levels of thyroid hormone. The pituitary may produce more TSH, usually resulting in a high level in the blood. However, the level of TSH does not always predict or reflect thyroid hormone levels. Some people produce an abnormal form of TSH that does not function properly. They often have hypothyroidism despite having normal or even mildly elevated TSH levels. In a variety of thyroid diseases, thyroid hormone levels may be high or low, regardless of the amount of TSH present in the blood. Rarely, pituitary dysfunction may result in increased or decreased amounts of TSH. In addition to pituitary dysfunction, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism can occur if there is a problem with the hypothalamus (insufficient or excessive TRH).

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm or from pricking the heel of an infant.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the TSH test, so tell your health practitioner about any drugs that you are taking. If you take thyroid hormone as treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample be drawn before you take your dose for that day.

F-T4' TSH

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F-T4' TSH Serum 550 Next day

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat across the windpipe at the base of the throat. The other major thyroid hormone is called triiodothyronine (T3) and together they help control the rate at which the body uses energy. Almost all of the T4 (and T3) found in the blood is bound to protein. The rest is free (unbound) and is the biologically active form of the hormone. This test measures the amount of free T4 in the blood. T4 production is regulated by a feedback system. When the level of T4 in the bloodstream decreases, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin releasing hormone, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to make and/or release more T4. As the blood concentration of T4 increases, TSH release is inhibited. T4 makes up about 90% of thyroid hormones. When the body requires thyroid hormone, the thyroid gland releases stored T4 into circulation. In the blood, T4 is either free (not bound) or bound to protein (primarily bound to thyroxine-binding globulin). The concentration of free T4 is only about 0.1% of that of total T4. T4 is converted into T3 in the liver or other tissues. T3, like T4, is also mostly bound to protein, but it is the free forms of T3 and T4 that are biologically active. Free T3 is 4 to 5 times more active than free T4 in circulation. If the thyroid gland does not produce sufficient T4, due to thyroid dysfunction or to insufficient TSH, then the affected person experiences symptoms of hypothyroidism such as weight gain, dry skin, cold intolerance, irregular menstruation, and fatigue. Severe untreated hypothyroidism, called myxedema, can lead to heart failure, seizures, and coma. In children, hypothyroidism can stunt growth and delay sexual development. If the thyroid gland produces too much T4, the rate of the person's body functions will increase and cause symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism such as increased heart rate, anxiety, weight loss, difficulty sleeping, tremors in the hands, and puffiness around dry, irritated eyes. The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction are related to autoimmune disorders. Graves disease causes hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto thyroiditis causes hypothyroidism. Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can also be caused by thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and excessive or deficient production of TSH. The effect of these conditions on thyroid hormone production can be detected and monitored by measuring the free T4.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm or from pricking the heel of an infant.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the free T4 test, so tell your health practitioner about any drugs that you are taking. If you take thyroid hormone as treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample be drawn before you take your dose for that day. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the pituitary gland, a tiny organ located below the brain and behind the sinus cavities. TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to release the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) into the blood. These thyroid hormones help control the rate at which the body uses energy. This test measures the amount of TSH in the blood. TSH, along with its regulatory hormone thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), which comes from the hypothalamus, is part of the feedback system that the body uses to maintain stable amounts of thyroid hormones in the blood. When thyroid hormone concentrations decrease, the production of TSH by the pituitary gland is increased. TSH in turn stimulates the production and release of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat flat against the windpipe. When all three organs are functioning normally, thyroid production turns on and off to maintain relatively stable levels of thyroid hormones in the blood. If the thyroid releases inappropriately large amounts of T4 and T3, the affected person may experience symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, such as rapid heart rate, weight loss, nervousness, hand tremors, irritated eyes, and difficulty sleeping. Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which the affected person's immune system produces antibodies that act like TSH, leading to the production of excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. In response, the pituitary may produce less TSH, usually leading to a low level in the blood. If there is decreased production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid (hypothyroidism), the person may experience symptoms such as weight gain, dry skin, constipation, cold intolerance, and fatigue. Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the U.S. It is a chronic autoimmune condition in which the immune response causes inflammation and damage to the thyroid as well as the production of autoantibodies. With Hashimoto thyroiditis, the thyroid produces low levels of thyroid hormone. The pituitary may produce more TSH, usually resulting in a high level in the blood. However, the level of TSH does not always predict or reflect thyroid hormone levels. Some people produce an abnormal form of TSH that does not function properly. They often have hypothyroidism despite having normal or even mildly elevated TSH levels. In a variety of thyroid diseases, thyroid hormone levels may be high or low, regardless of the amount of TSH present in the blood. Rarely, pituitary dysfunction may result in increased or decreased amounts of TSH. In addition to pituitary dysfunction, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism can occur if there is a problem with the hypothalamus (insufficient or excessive TRH).

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained from a needle placed in a vein in the arm or from pricking the heel of an infant.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed. Certain medications can interfere with the TSH test, so tell your health practitioner about any drugs that you are taking. If you take thyroid hormone as treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample be drawn before you take your dose for that day.

Ferric Chloride Test, Urine

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Ferric Chloride Test, Urine Urine 150 3 Days

Ferric Chloride Test, Urine Of value in the diagnosis of epidemic dropsy and certain drug intoxications (salicylates and phenothiazines), and in the diagnosis of several inborn errors of amino acid metabolism (phenylketonuria, maple syrup urine disease, and alkaptonuria). Also occasionally used to detect melanin in the urine.

Description of Ferric Chloride Test

A spot urine sample is obtained. Ferric chloride solution is added to the urine sample, and characteristic color changes occur depending on the pathologic condition present (that is, purple with salicylates, purple-pink with phenothiazines, gray with melanin, for example).
Condition
Color Change in Urine
Alcoholism Red or red-brown
Alkaptonuria Blue or green, fades quickly
Diabetes Red or red-brown
Drug ingestion
Acetophenetidines Red
Aminosalicylic acid Red-brown
Antipyrines Red
Cyanates Red
Phenol derivative Violet
Phenothiazines Purple-pink
Salicylates Stable purple
Histidinemia Green or blue-green
Maple syrup urine disease Blue
Phenylketonuria Blue or blue-green, fades to yellow
Starvation Red or red-brown
Tyrosinosis Green, fades in seconds
Other products
Alpha-ketobutyricacid Purple, fades to red-brown
Bilirubin Blue-green
o-Hydroxyphenyl-acetic acid Mauve
o-Hydroxyphenyl-pyruvic acid Red
Pyruvic acid Deep gold-yellow or green
Xanthurenic acid Deep green, later brown
           

Ferritin, Blood

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Ferritin, Blood Serum 900 2 Days

Your body relies on iron in red blood cells to carry oxygen to all its Ferritin cells. Without enough iron, your red blood cells will be unable to supply enough oxygen. However, too much iron isn’t good for your body either. Both high and low iron levels may indicate a serious underlying problem. If your doctor suspects you’re experiencing an iron deficiency or an iron overload, they may order a ferritin test. This measures the amount of stored iron in your body, which can give your doctor an overall picture of your iron levels.

What is ferritin?

Ferritin isn’t the same thing as iron in your body. Instead, it is a protein that stores iron, releasing it when your body needs it. it usually lives in your body’s cells, with very little actually circulating in your blood.  it contains 20 percent iron. The greatest concentrations of it are typically in the cells of the liver (known as hepatocytes) and immune system (known as reticuloendothelial cells). it is stored in the body’s cells until it’s time to make more red blood cells. The body will signal the cells to release it . The ferritin then binds to another substance called transferrin. Transferrin is a protein that combines with it to transport it to where new red blood cells are made. Imagine transferrin as a dedicated taxi for iron. While it’s important for a person to have normal iron levels, having enough stored iron is important too. If a person doesn’t have enough it , iron stores can deplete quickly.

Purpose of a ferritin test

If you don’t have enough it in your blood or you have too much, it can give your doctor clues about your overall iron levels. The more it in your blood, the more stored iron your body has.

Low ferritin levels

Your doctor may order a it test if you have some of the following symptoms associated with low it levels:
  • unexplained fatigue
  • dizziness
  • chronic headaches
  • unexplained weakness
  • ringing in your ears
  • irritability
  • leg pains
  • shortness of breath

High ferritin levels

You can also have very high ferritin levels, which can cause unpleasant symptoms as well. Symptoms of excess it include:
  • stomach pain
  • heart palpitations or chest pains
  • unexplained weakness
  • joint pain
  • unexplained fatigue
the levels can also increase as a result of damage to your organs, such as the liver and spleen. The test can also be used to monitor your overall health, particularly if you have an iron-related condition that causes you to have too much or too little iron in your blood.

Fetal Hemoglobin

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Fetal Haemoglobin EDTA Blood 250 4 Days

A fetal hemoglobin test (Hgb electrophoresis) measures the level of fetal hemoglobin (Hemoglobin F or HbF) in the blood of infants and children. It can also be measured in adults, though is more typically needed for diagnoses of congenital illnesses in children. hemoglobin, an alkali-resistant form of hemoglobin, is the major hemoglobin component in the bloodstream of the fetus. After birth, it decreases rapidly until only traces are found in healthy children and adults. hemoglobin is one of six types of hemoglobin measured in the clinical laboratory by a method called hemoglobin electrophoresis.

Purpose of The Test

The determination of hemoglobin in the blood of infants and children identifies normal and abnormal levels, defining what percentage of total hemoglobin is made up of hemoglobin. Knowing this level may help doctors evaluate low concentrations of normal hemoglobin in red blood cells (anemia), as well as higher-than-normal levels of fetal hemoglobin or its hereditary persistence. Fetal hemoglobin measurement helps diagnose a group of inherited disorders that affect hemoglobin production, among which are the thalassemias and sickle cell anemia . It may also be done to help doctors diagnose acquired illnesses such as acquired hemolytic anemia, leukemia, pernicious anemia, and certain types of cancer .

Description Of The Test

Hemoglobin is the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. It is also the pigment that gives red blood cells their color. Red blood cells deliver hemoglobin throughout the body, ensuring that all body tissues have the oxygen they need for life and proper function. Hemoglobin consists primarily of iron-bearing proteins called heme groups and moiety globin protein, which together give hemoglobin its ability to carry oxygen. The heme groups are molecular chains of different types and actually create six different hemoglobins that vary in their amino acid composition and also in the genes that control them. Among the six types of hemoglobin, HbA is the normal adult hemoglobin, and HbF is the major fetal hemoglobin. Abnormal types of hemoglobin include Hgb S and Hgb C. All types of hemoglobin are electrically charged, which enables them to be identified and quantified in the laboratory by hemoglobin electrophoresis techniques. During fetal development, fetal hemoglobin composes about 90 percent of total hemoglobin. At birth, the newborn's blood is composed of about 70 percent fetal hemoglobin. As the infant's bone marrow begins to produce new red cells, fetal hemoglobin begins to decrease rapidly. Normally, only 2 percent or less of total hemoglobin is found as fetal hemoglobin after six months and throughout childhood; in adulthood, only traces (0.5% or less) are found in total hemoglobin.

Fetal Hemoglobin by HPLC

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Fetal Haemoglobin by HPLC EDTA Blood 700 4 Days

A hemoglobin electrophoresis test is a blood test used to measure and identify the different types of Hb in your bloodstream. Hb is the protein inside red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen to your tissues and organs. Genetic mutations can cause your body to produce Hb that is formed incorrectly. This abnormal Hb can cause too little oxygen to reach your tissues and organs. There are hundreds of different types of hemoglobin. They include:
  • Hb F: This is also known as fetal hemoglobin. It’s the type found in growing fetuses and newborns. It’s replaced with Hb A soon after birth.
  • Hb A: This is also known as adult hemoglobin. It’s the most common type of hemoglobin. It’s found in healthy children and adults.
  • Hb C, D, E, M, and S: These are rare types of abnormal Hb  caused by genetic mutations.

Normal levels of Hb types

A Hb electrophoresis test doesn’t tell you about the amount of Hb in your blood — that’s done in a complete blood count. The levels that a Hb electrophoresis test refer to are the percentages of the different types of Hb that may be found in your blood. This is different in babies and adults:

In infants

Hb is mostly made up of Hb F in fetuses. Hb F still makes up the majority of Hb in newborns. It quickly declines by the time your baby is a year old: Genetic mutations can cause your body to produce Hb that is formed incorrectly. This abnormal Hb can cause too little oxygen to reach your tissues and organs.

Follic Acid / FOLATE

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Follic Acid / FOLATE Serum 1200 2 Days

A Follic Acid test measures the amount of folic acid in the blood. Folic acid is vitamin B-9, which is essential for the production of healthy red blood cells. These cells deliver oxygen to the entire body, so they’re vital for maintaining overall health. Folic acid is also important for the normal development of a fetus. It helps with cell and tissue growth as well as the creation of DNA, which carries genetic information. This is why folic acid is particularly critical for women who are pregnant or who are planning to become pregnant. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women should take 400 micrograms of folic acid every day, starting at least one month before getting pregnant. Taking extra folic acid during pregnancy can help prevent brain and spinal cord birth defects, such as spina bifida and a cleft lip or cleft palate. While there are folic acid supplements, the vitamin is also naturally found in several foods, including:
  • liver
  • citrus fruits
  • whole grains
  • beans
  • lentils
  • peas
  • milk
  • dark green, leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale
  • bok choy
  • broccoli
  • avocados
  • Brussels sprouts
  • fortified cereals
If you aren’t consuming enough folic acid, you may develop a folic acid deficiency. While mild folic acid deficiency usually doesn’t trigger symptoms, severe folic acid deficiency can cause diarrhea, fatigue, and a sore tongue. The deficiency may also lead to a more serious condition known as anemia, which is caused by a lack of healthy red blood cells. Since folic acid levels can be measured in the bloodstream, a folic acid test can determine whether someone has folic acid deficiency.

Why Is a Folic Acid Test Performed?

Your doctor may perform a folic acid test if you’re showing symptoms of folic acid deficiency. They might also order the test if you’re experiencing symptoms of vitamin B-12 deficiency, as a lack of either vitamin can cause anemia. The symptoms of a folic acid or vitamin B-12 deficiency include:
  • diarrhea or constipation
  • a swollen, red tongue
  • bleeding gums
  • a lack of appetite
  • fatigue
  • headaches
  • numbness
  • difficulty walking
  • memory loss
The symptoms of anemia include:
  • unusually pale skin
  • fatigue
  • dizziness
  • lightheadedness
  • weakness
  • rapid heart rate
  • shortness of breath
  • headaches
  • confusion
If you already have either of these conditions, then a folic acid test can be done to see if the treatment is working. You may also need this test if you have an intestinal disorder, such as celiac disease or Crohn’s disease. These disorders make it difficult for your body to absorb folic acid properly, so you’ll need to be checked regularly. A folic acid test is particularly important for women who are pregnant or who are planning to become pregnant. Consuming a sufficient amount of folic acid is critical for preventing certain birth defects and for ensuring the normal development of the fetus.

FSH (Follic Stimulating Hormone)

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FSH (Follic Stimulating Hormone) Serum 450 same day

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is an important part of the reproductive system. It’s responsible for the growth of ovarian follicles. Follicles produce estrogen and progesterone in the ovaries and help maintain the menstrual cycles in women. In men, Follic Stimulating Hormone is a part of the development of the gonads as well as sperm production.

The FSH test measures the level of Follic Stimulating Hormone found in your blood. Your doctor will order an Follic Stimulating Hormone test to find the underlying cause of symptoms affecting the reproductive system.

The Purpose of the FSH Level Test

An Follic Stimulating Hormone test is a simple blood test. Women might be asked to have this test done at a specific point in their menstrual cycle, usually the first couple of days.

Follic Stimulating Hormone Test for Women

In women, the most common reasons for an FSH test include:

  • assessing infertility problems
  • assessing irregular menstrual cycles
  • diagnosing disorders of the pituitary gland or diseases involving the ovaries

Follic Stimulating Hormone Test for Men

In men, an Follic Stimulating Hormone test may be done to:

  • evaluate a low sperm count
  • assess hypogonadism or gonadal failure
  • assess testicular dysfunction

Follic Stimulating Hormone Test for Children

An Follic Stimulating Hormone test might be used to determine if a child is experiencing precocious puberty, which is early puberty. An Follic Stimulating Hormone test may also be used to determine if a child is experiencing delayed puberty. This occurs when sexual features or organs don’t develop when they should.

G-6-PD

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G-6-PD EDTA 450

A G-6-PD test measures the levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an enzyme in your blood. An enzyme is a type of protein that’s important for cell function. G-6-PD helps red blood cells (RBCs) function normally. It also protects them from potentially harmful byproducts that can accumulate when your body is fighting infection or as the result of certain medications. A lack of G6PD may make RBCs more vulnerable to breaking down in a process called hemolysis. A G-6-PD test is a simple test that requires a blood sample. It’s typically ordered to test for G-6-PD deficiencies.
Why is a G-6-PD test used?
A G6PD deficiency is an inherited disorder. It’s most common in men of African, Asian, or Mediterranean descent. It’s the result of X-linked recessive transmission, which means it’s much more likely to affect men as opposed to women. The deficiency can lead to a certain type of anemia known as hemolytic anemia. The G-6-PD test is often used to determine the causes of hemolytic anemia. G-6-PD protects oxygen-rich RBCs from chemicals called reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS build up in your body:
  • during a fever or infection
  • when you take certain medications
  • when you eat fava beans
If your G-6-PD levels are too low, your RBCs won’t be protected from these chemicals. The blood cells will die, leading to anemia. Certain foods, medications, infections, and severe stress can trigger a hemolytic episode. A hemolytic episode is the rapid destruction of RBCs. In people with hemolytic anemia, the body can’t produce enough RBCs to replace those that have been destroyed. Your doctor may order a G6PD test if they suspect you have hemolytic anemia based on symptoms such as:
  • an enlarged spleen
  • fainting
  • fatigue
  • jaundice
  • pale skin
  • rapid heart rate
  • red or brown urine
  • shortness of breath
A G-6-PD test is most often ordered after a doctor has ruled out other causes of anemia and jaundice. They’ll perform the test once a hemolytic episode has subsided. Your doctor may also order the test to monitor treatments or confirm the findings of other blood tests.

GGT/GGTP (Gama GT/Y-Glutamy/Transpeptidase)

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GGT/GGTP (Gama GT/Y-Glutamy/Transpeptidase) serum 370 5 Days

Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) is an enzyme that is found in many organs throughout the body, with the highest concentrations found in the liver. GGTs is elevated in the blood in most diseases that cause damage to the liver or bile ducts. This test measures the level of GGTs in a blood sample. Normally, GGTs is present in low levels, but when the liver is injured, the GGT slevel can rise. GGTs is usually the first liver enzyme to rise in the blood when any of the bile ducts that carry bile from the liver to the intestines become obstructed, for example, by tumors or stones. This makes it the most sensitive liver enzyme test for detecting bile duct problems. However, the GGT test is not very specific and is not useful in differentiating between various causes of liver damage because it can be elevated with many types of liver diseases, such as liver cancer and viral hepatitis, as well as other non-hepatic conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome. For this reason, the GGT test is not recommended for routine use by itself. However, it can be useful in conjunction with other tests and in determining the cause of a high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level, another enzyme found in the liver. Both GGT and ALP are increased in liver diseases, but only ALP will be increased with diseases affecting bone tissue. Therefore, GGT can be used as a follow up to an elevated ALP to help determine if the high ALP result is due to liver or bone disease. GGT levels are sometimes increased with consumption of even small amounts of alcohol. Higher levels are found more commonly in chronic heavy drinkers than in people who consume less than 2 to 3 drinks per day or who only drink heavily on occasion (binge drinkers). The GGT test may be used in evaluating someone for acute or chronic alcohol abuse.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

GGT levels fall after meals. You may be instructed to fast (have nothing to eat or drink except water) for at least 8 hours prior to the test. Alcohol and certain prescription medications can affect GGT levels, so you may be asked to abstain from them prior to the test as well.

GH ( Growth Hormone )

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GH ( Growth Hormone ) Fasting Serum 780 7 Days

Growth hormone (GH), also known as human growth hormone (HGH) or somatotropin, is one of several hormones produced by the pituitary gland in your brain. Growth Hormone plays a crucial role in normal human growth and development, especially in children and adolescents. Growth Hormone levels that are higher or lower than they should be can lead to health problems in both children and adults.

A serum growth hormone test (GH test) is used to measure the amount of GH in your blood. It is not a routine blood test, since abnormalities of Growth Hormone are uncommon. If your doctor has a strong suspicion that you have hormonal abnormalities, they will use the test to confirm a diagnosis and guide management. Finding any Growth Hormone problems can help treatment be more effective.

Limitations of General GH Testing

Doctors can accurately measure the levels of some hormones in your blood simply by drawing a sample and analyzing it in the lab. However, GH testing is not so simple. Finding the level of the hormone at a single point in time doesn’t always help your doctor make a diagnosis because levels of this hormone naturally rise and fall throughout the day. This is why more specialized GH tests are usually used.

Your doctor will likely order either a growth hormone suppression test or a growth hormone stimulation test, depending on whether your doctor suspects that you’re producing too much or too little growth hormone. Frequently, an insulin-like growth factor-1 test (IGF-1 test) is also ordered. If you have an excess or a deficiency of Growth Hormone , you will also have higher or lower than normal levels of IGF-1. The key advantage of examining IGF is that, unlike GH, its levels remain stable.

Globulin

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Globulin Serum 100 Same day

Globulin are a group of proteins in your blood. They are made in your liver by your immune system. Globulins play an important role in liver function, blood clotting, and fighting infection. There are four main types of globulins. They are called alpha 1, alpha 2, beta, and gamma. Just as there are different types of globulins, there are different types of globulin tests. These include:

  • Total protein test. This blood test measures two types of proteins: globulin and albumin. If protein levels are low, it can mean that you have liver or kidney disease.
  • Serum protein electrophoresis. This blood test measures gamma globulins and other proteins in your blood. It can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions, including disorders of the immune system and a type of cancer called multiple myeloma.
Other names for globulin tests: Serum globulin electrophoresis, total protein

What is it used for?

Globulin tests can be used to help diagnose a variety of conditions, including:
  • Liver damage or disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Nutritional problems
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Certain types of cancer

Why do I need a globulin test?

Your health care provider may order globulin tests as part your regular checkup or to help diagnose specific conditions. A total protein test may be included in a series of tests to check how well your liver is working. These tests, called liver function tests, may be ordered if you are at risk for liver disease or have symptoms of liver disease, which may include:
  • Jaundice, a condition that causes your skin and eyes to turn yellow
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Itching
  • Recurring fatigue
  • Fluid buildup in the abdomen, feet, and legs
  • Loss of appetite
A serum protein electrophoresis test measures gamma globulins and other proteins. This test may be ordered to diagnose disorders related to the immune system, including:
  • Allergies
  • Autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis
  • Multiple myeloma, a type of cancer

What happens during a globulin test?

Globulin tests are blood tests. During a blood test, a health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm, using a small needle. After the needle is inserted, a small amount of blood will be collected into a test tube or vial. You may feel a little sting when the needle goes in or out. This usually takes less than five minutes.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You don't need any special preparations for a globulin test. If your health care provider has also ordered other blood tests, you may need to fast (not eat or drink) for several hours before the test. Your health care provider will let you know if there are any special instructions to follow.

Haemoglobinopathy/ Electrophoresis HPLC

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Haemoglobinopathy/Electrophoresis HPLC EDTA 600 5 Days

A hemoglobin electrophoresis test is a blood test used to measure and identify the different types of hemoglobin in your bloodstream. Hemoglobin is the protein inside red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen to your tissues and organs. Genetic mutations can cause your body to produce hemoglobin that is formed incorrectly. This abnormal hemoglobin can cause too little oxygen to reach your tissues and organs. There are hundreds of different types of hemoglobin. They include:
  • Hemoglobin F: This is also known as fetal hemoglobin. It’s the type found in growing fetuses and newborns. It’s replaced with hemoglobin A soon after birth.
  • Hemoglobin A: This is also known as adult hemoglobin. It’s the most common type of hemoglobin. It’s found in healthy children and adults.
  • Hemoglobin C, D, E, M, and S: These are rare types of abnormal hemoglobin caused by genetic mutations.

Results: The mean (SD) imprecision (CV) of the retention time was 1.0 (0.7)% with no statistical difference compared with the imprecision for normalized retention times. Among 60293 samples tested, we encountered 34 unique hemoglobin variants and 2 tetramers. Eighteen variants and 2 tetramers could be identified solely by retention time and 3 variants by retention time and proportion of total hemoglobin. Four variants could be identified by retention time and peak characteristics and eight variants by retention time and electrophoretic mobility. One variant (HbNew York) was missed on HPLC. Retention time on HPLC was superior to electrophoresis for the differentiation and identification of six members of the HbJ family, four members of the HbD family, and three variants with electrophoretic mobilities identical or similar to that of HbC. Six variants with electrophoretic mobilities identical or similar to that of HbS could be differentiated and identified by retention time and proportion of total hemoglobin. HPLC detected two variants (HbTy Gard and HbTwin Peaks) missed on electrophoresis.

Conclusions: The retention time on HPLC is reliable, reproducible, and in many cases superior to conventional hemoglobin electrophoresis for the detection and identification of hemoglobin variants. Confirmatory testing by electrophoresis can be eliminated in the majority of cases by use of retention time, proportion of total hemoglobin, and peak characteristics of HPLC.

Haemogram & ESR

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Haemogram & ESR EDTA Blood 200 same day

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test that indirectly measures the degree of inflammation present in the body. The test actually measures the rate of fall (sedimentation) of erythrocytes (red blood cells) in a sample of blood that has been placed into a tall, thin, vertical tube. Results are reported as the millimeters of clear fluid (plasma) that are present at the top portion of the tube after one hour. When a sample of blood is placed in a tube, the red blood cells normally settle out relatively slowly, leaving little clear plasma. The red cells settle at a faster rate in the presence of an increased level of proteins, particularly proteins called acute phase reactants. The level of acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen increases in the blood in response to inflammation. Inflammation is part of the body's immune response. It can be acute, developing rapidly after trauma, injury or infection, for example, or can occur over an extended time (chronic) with conditions such as autoimmune diseases or cancer. The ESR is not diagnostic; it is a non-specific test that may be elevated in a number of these different conditions. It provides general information about the presence or absence of an inflammatory condition. There have been questions about the usefulness of the ESR in light of newer tests that have come into use that are more specific. However, ESR test is typically indicated for the diagnosis and monitoring of temporal arteritis, systemic vasculitis and polymyalgia rheumatica. Extremely elevated ESR is useful in developing a rheumatic disease differential diagnosis. In addition, ESR may still be a good option in some situations, when, for example, the newer tests are not available in areas with limited resources or when monitoring the course of a disease.

HB & ESR

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HB & ESR EDTA Blood 60 same day

HB & ESR test is a complete blood routine test carried out to measure the levels of different components of the blood. The test measures Hb (Hemoglobin), TC (Total count), DC (Differential count), and ESR(Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate).It gives information about the general health of a person.HB & ESR or total count measures the number of WBCs or white blood cells, which if high in number are indicative of an infection. DC measures the structure and consistency of WBCs and counts the percentage of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. ESR levels check for inflammation in the body. Hb measures the number of red blood cells in the blood.

 Preparation For The  HB & ESR Test

No special preparation is required for the test. The doctor should be informed of prior medical history and medications being taken and existing allergies, for specific instructions.
Use Of The Test
The normal levels of the different components of the blood are as follows: TC : 4000-11000/cu.mm DC (in %): Neutrophils – 40-70 Basophils – 0-1 Eosinophils – 1-6 Monocytes – 2-10 Lymphocytes – 20-45 Higher levels of DC and TC are indicative of cancers such as leukemia. Hemoglobin (in %): 11-16. Low levels of Hb are indicative of sickle cell anemia. ESR (in %): 2-16. High levels of HB & ESR can be indicative of an auto-immune disease, tuberculosis, thyroid disease or other infections, while low levels of HB & ESR are indicative of diseases such as sickle cell anemia and congestive heart failure. The levels of these components should be corresponded with the levels of other components of the blood to get a clearer picture of the disease being indicated.

HB( Heamoglobin)

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HB( Heamoglobin) EDTA Blood 50 same day

A hemoglobin test measures the levels of hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells that carries oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. If your hemoglobin levels are abnormal, it may be a sign that you have a blood disorder.

What is it used for?

A hemoglobin test is often used to check for anemia, a condition in which your body has fewer red blood cells than normal. If you have anemia, your cells don't get all the oxygen they need. Hemoglobin tests are also frequently performed with other tests, such as:
  • Hematocrit, which measures the percentage of red blood cells in your blood
  • Complete blood count, which measures the number and type of cells in your blood

Why do I need a hemoglobin test?

Your health care provider may have ordered the test as part of a routine exam, or if you have:
  • Symptoms of anemia, which include weakness, dizziness, pale skin, and cold hands and feet
  • A family history of thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or other inherited blood disorder
  • A diet low in iron and minerals
  • A long-term infection
  • Excessive blood loss from an injury or surgical procedure

What happens during a hemoglobin test?

A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm, using a small needle. After the needle is inserted, a small amount of blood will be collected into a test tube or vial. You may feel a little sting when the needle goes in or out. This usually takes less than five minutes.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You don't need any special preparations for a hemoglobin test. If your health care provider has also ordered other blood tests, you may need to fast (not eat or drink) for several hours before the test. Your health care provider will let you know if there are any special instructions to follow.

HbA1C (Glycorylated Heumodlobin) by HPLC

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HbA1C (Glycorylated Heumodlobin) by HPLC EDTA Blood 550 next day

The HbA1c test, also known as the haemoglobin A1c or glycated haemoglobin test, is an important blood test that gives a good indication of how well your diabetes is being controlled. Together with the fasting plasma glucose test, the HbA1c test is one of the main ways in which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. HbA1c tests are not the primary diagnostic test for type 1 diabetes but may sometimes be used together with other tests. For HbA1c guidelines for monitoring diabetes control,

HbA1c testing in diagnosing diabetes

The World Health Organisation (WHO) suggests the following diagnostic guidelines for diabetes:
  • below 42 mmol/mol (6.0%): Non-diabetic
  • between 42 and 47 mmol/mol (6.0–6.4%): Impaired glucose regulation      (IGR) or Prediabetes
  • of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) or over: Type 2 diabetes
If your test returns a reading of 6.0–6.4%, that indicates prediabetes. Your doctor should work with you to suggest appropriate lifestyle changes that could reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. it is not used to diagnose gestational diabetes in the UK. Instead, an oral glucose tolerance test is used. A random blood glucose test will usually be used to diagnose type 1 diabetes. However, in some cases, an test may be used to support a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The test, also known as the haemoglobin A1c or glycated haemoglobin test, is an important blood test that gives a good indication of how well your diabetes is being controlled. Together with the fasting plasma glucose test, the test is one of the main ways in which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. tests are not the primary diagnostic test for type 1 diabetes but may sometimes be used together with other tests.

HBcAb (Hepatitis B core Antibody) Totalserum

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HBcAb (Hepatitis B core Antibody) Totalserum serum 250 Next day

The HBcAb virus panel is an array of tests used to detect viral hepatitis infections. It can distinguish between current and past infections. The viral panel uses antibody and antigen tests, which allows it to detect multiple kinds of viruses simultaneously. Antibodies are proteins made by your body’s immune system to fight against harmful substances. Antibodies react to proteins known as antigens. Antigens may be from fungi, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Each antibody recognizes a specific type of antigen. It can also distinguish between current and past infections.

What the HBcAb Test Addresses

Your doctor may recommend a hepatitis viral panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as:
  • abdominal pain or bloating
  • dark colored urine
  • low-grade fever
  • jaundice
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • breast development in males
  • general itching

The viral HBcAb panel is used to:

  • detect current or past hepatitis infections
  • determine how contagious your hepatitis is
  • monitor your hepatitis treatment
  • check whether you’ve been vaccinated

The test HBcAb may also be performed to detect:

  • chronic persistent hepatitis
  • delta agent (hepatitis D), a rare form of hepatitis that only occurs in people with hepatitis B (HBV)
  • nephrotic syndrome, a type of kidney damage

Where and How the Test Is Administered

Your doctor will need to take a sample of blood from your arm. To do this, they’ll clean the site with a swab of rubbing alcohol and insert a needle into a vein that’s attached to a tube. When enough blood has collected in the tube, the needle is removed. The site is covered with an absorbent pad. If the blood sample is being taken from an infant or young child, the doctor will use a tool called a lancet. This pricks the skin and may be less frightening than a needle. The blood will be collected on a slide and a bandage will cover the site.

HBcAb (Hepatitis B core Antibody) IgM

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HBcAb (Hepatitis B core Antibody) IgM serum 250 3 Days

The HBcAb virus panel is an array of tests used to detect viral hepatitis infections. It can distinguish between current and past infections. The viral panel uses antibody and antigen tests, which allows it to detect multiple kinds of viruses simultaneously. Antibodies are proteins made by your body’s immune system to fight against harmful substances. Antibodies react to proteins known as antigens. Antigens may be from fungi, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Each antibody recognizes a specific type of antigen. It can also distinguish between current and past infections.

What the HBcAb Test Addresses

Your doctor may recommend a hepatitis viral panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as:
  • abdominal pain or bloating
  • dark colored urine
  • low-grade fever
  • jaundice
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • breast development in males
  • general itching

The viral HBcAb panel is used to:

  • detect current or past hepatitis infections
  • determine how contagious your hepatitis is
  • monitor your hepatitis treatment
  • check whether you’ve been vaccinated

The test HBcAb may also be performed to detect:

  • chronic persistent hepatitis
  • delta agent (hepatitis D), a rare form of hepatitis that only occurs in people with hepatitis B (HBV)
  • nephrotic syndrome, a type of kidney damage

Where and How the Test Is Administered

Your doctor will need to take a sample of blood from your arm. To do this, they’ll clean the site with a swab of rubbing alcohol and insert a needle into a vein that’s attached to a tube. When enough blood has collected in the tube, the needle is removed. The site is covered with an absorbent pad. If the blood sample is being taken from an infant or young child, the doctor will use a tool called a lancet. This pricks the skin and may be less frightening than a needle. The blood will be collected on a slide and a bandage will cover the site.

HBcAb Screening/ Australia antigen test

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HBsAg Screening/ Australia antigen test serum 250 Next day

The HBcAb virus panel is an array of tests used to detect viral hepatitis infections. It can distinguish between current and past infections. The viral panel uses antibody and antigen tests, which allows it to detect multiple kinds of viruses simultaneously. Antibodies are proteins made by your body’s immune system to fight against harmful substances. Antibodies react to proteins known as antigens. Antigens may be from fungi, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Each antibody recognizes a specific type of antigen. It can also distinguish between current and past infections.

What the HBcAb Test Addresses

Your doctor may recommend a hepatitis viral panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as:
  • abdominal pain or bloating
  • dark colored urine
  • low-grade fever
  • jaundice
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • breast development in males
  • general itching

The viral HBcAb panel is used to:

  • detect current or past hepatitis infections
  • determine how contagious your hepatitis is
  • monitor your hepatitis treatment
  • check whether you’ve been vaccinated

The test HBcAb may also be performed to detect:

  • chronic persistent hepatitis
  • delta agent (hepatitis D), a rare form of hepatitis that only occurs in people with hepatitis B (HBV)
  • nephrotic syndrome, a type of kidney damage

Where and How the Test Is Administered

Your doctor will need to take a sample of blood from your arm. To do this, they’ll clean the site with a swab of rubbing alcohol and insert a needle into a vein that’s attached to a tube. When enough blood has collected in the tube, the needle is removed. The site is covered with an absorbent pad. If the blood sample is being taken from an infant or young child, the doctor will use a tool called a lancet. This pricks the skin and may be less frightening than a needle. The blood will be collected on a slide and a bandage will cover the site.

HbeAg (Hepatitis B envelop Antigen)

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HbeAg (Hepatitis B envelop Antigen) Serum 250 Next day

The HbeAg hepatitis virus panel is an array of tests used to detect viral hepatitis infections. It can distinguish between current and past infections. The viral panel uses antibody and antigen tests, which allows it to detect multiple kinds of viruses simultaneously. Antibodies are proteins made by your body’s immune system to fight against harmful substances. Antibodies react to proteins known as antigens. Antigens may be from fungi, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Each antibody recognizes a specific type of antigen. It can also distinguish between current and past infections.

What the HbeAg Test Addresses

Your doctor may recommend a HbeAg viral panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as:
  • abdominal pain or bloating
  • dark colored urine
  • low-grade fever
  • jaundice
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • breast development in males
  • general itching

The HbeAg  viral panel is used to:

  • detect current or past hepatitis infections
  • determine how contagious your hepatitis is
  • monitor your hepatitis treatment
  • check whether you’ve been vaccinated

The HbeAg  test may also be performed to detect:

  • chronic persistent hepatitis
  • delta agent (hepatitis D), a rare form of hepatitis that only occurs in people with hepatitis B (HBV)
  • nephrotic syndrome, a type of kidney damage

Where and How the Test Is Administered

Your doctor will need to take a sample of blood from your arm. To do this, they’ll clean the site with a swab of rubbing alcohol and insert a needle into a vein that’s attached to a tube. When enough blood has collected in the tube, the needle is removed. The site is covered with an absorbent pad. If the blood sample is being taken from an infant or young child, the doctor will use a tool called a lancet. This pricks the skin and may be less frightening than a needle. The blood will be collected on a slide and a bandage will cover the site.

HBsAb (Hepatitis B surface Antibody)

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HBsAb (Hepatitis B surface Antibody) Serum 220 3 Days

The hepatitis virus panel is an array of tests used to detect viral hepatitis infections. It can distinguish between current and past infections. The viral panel uses antibody and antigen tests, which allows it to detect multiple kinds of viruses simultaneously. Antibodies are proteins made by your body’s immune system to fight against harmful substances. Antibodies react to proteins known as antigens. Antigens may be from fungi, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Each antibody recognizes a specific type of antigen. It can also distinguish between current and past infections.

What the Test Addresses

Your doctor may recommend a hepatitis viral panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as:
  • abdominal pain or bloating
  • dark colored urine
  • low-grade fever
  • jaundice
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • breast development in males
  • general itching

The viral panel is used to:

  • detect current or past HBsAb infections
  • determine how contagious your HBsAb is
  • monitor your HBsAb treatment
  • check whether you’ve been vaccinated

The test may also be performed to detect:

  • chronic persistent hepatitis
  • delta agent (HBsAb D), a rare form of HBsAb that only occurs in people with hepatitis B (HBV)
  • nephrotic syndrome, a type of kidney damage

Where and How the Test Is Administered

Your doctor will need to take a sample of blood from your arm. To do this, they’ll clean the site with a swab of rubbing alcohol and insert a needle into a vein that’s attached to a tube. When enough blood has collected in the tube, the needle is removed. The site is covered with an absorbent pad. If the blood sample is being taken from an infant or young child, the doctor will use a tool called a lancet. This pricks the skin and may be less frightening than a needle. The blood will be collected on a slide and a bandage will cover the site.

HIV 1&2 Anti-bodies Rapid Test

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HIV 1&2 Anti-bodies Rapid Test serum 550 Same day

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIVs screening tests detect the HIVs antigen (p24) and/or HIV antibodies produced in response to an HIVs infection in the blood. Some tests detect HIVs antibody in oral fluid. When a person becomes infected with HIV, through exposure to the blood or body fluids of an infected individual or a contaminated needle, for example, the virus begins to replicate itself, producing a large number of copies. During the first few weeks of infection, the amount of virus (viral load) and the p24 antigen level in the blood can be quite high. About 2-8 weeks after exposure to the virus, the immune system responds by producing antibodies directed against the virus that can be detected in the blood. As the initial infection resolves and the level of HIV antibody increases, both virus and p24 antigen levels decrease in the blood. An HIVs infection may initially cause no symptoms or cause flu-like symptoms that resolve after a week or two. The only way to determine whether a person has been infected is through HIVs testing. If HIVs is not detected early and treated, it may become a simmering infection that may cause few symptoms for a decade or more. If the infection is still not treated, eventually symptoms of AIDS emerge and begin to progressively worsen. Over time and without treatment, HIV destroys the immune system and leaves a person's body vulnerable to debilitating infections. (You can read more about this in the article on HIVs Infection and AIDS.) Detecting and diagnosing HIVs early in the course of infection is important because:
  • It allows for early treatment that slows progression to AIDS.
  • An individual can learn of their status and modify behavior so as to prevent the spread of disease.
  • A pregnant woman can undergo treatment that would help prevent passing the disease to her child.
There are two types of HIV, 1 and 2. HIV-1 is the most common type found in the United States, while HIV-2 has a higher prevalence in parts of Africa. A few different testing options are available for HIV screening:
  • Combination HIVs antibody and HIVs antigen test—the recommended screening test for HIV; it is available only as a blood test.
  • HIV antibody testing—all HIVs antibody tests used in the U.S. detect HIV-1 and some tests have been developed that can also detect HIV-2. These tests are available as blood tests or tests of oral fluid.
  • p24 antigen testing—this is used alone without the antibody test only in rare cases when there is a question about interference with an HIV antibody test.
Regardless of the type of screening test used, a positive result requires follow up with supplemental testing to establish a diagnosis of HIVs.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm or from a fingerstick. There also are tests available that can be performed on oral samples. An oral sample is obtained by using a special small, spatula-like device with a flat pad on the end. The flat pad is placed above the teeth against the outer gum and is swabbed completely once around the outer part of the upper and lower gums.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

HLA B27

Scientific Name Specimen Price( Rs ) ReportDelivery
HLAB27 EDTA 1500 7 Days

Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA -B27) is a protein located on the surface of your white blood cells. An HLAs-B27 test is a blood test that identifies HLAs-B27 proteins. Human leukocyte antigens ( HLAs ) are proteins commonly found on white blood cells. These antigens help your immune system identify the differences between healthy body tissue and foreign substances that may cause infection. Although most HLAs protect your body from harm, HLA-B27 is a specific type of protein that contributes to immune system dysfunction. The presence of HLA-B27 on your white blood cells can cause your immune system to attack those otherwise healthy cells. When this occurs, it can result in an autoimmune disease or immune-mediated disease, such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis.
Why is the test ordered?

Monitoring disease progression

The presence of HLA-B27 is associated with certain autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases, including:
  • ankylosing spondylitis, which causes inflammation of the bones in your spine
  • reactive arthritis, which causes inflammation of your joints, urethra, and eyes, and sometimes lesions on your skin
  • juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
  • anterior uveitis, which causes swelling and irritation in the middle layer of your eye
A doctor may order the HLA-B27 test to monitor the progression of these and other autoimmune diseases.

Diagnostic uses

For people with specific symptoms, the HLA-B27 test may be used along with other blood, urine, or imaging tests to confirm the diagnosis of an autoimmune disease. The symptoms that might prompt a doctor to order the test include:
  • joint pain
  • stiffness or swelling of your spine, neck, or chest
  • inflammation of your joints or urethra accompanied by skin lesions
  • recurring inflammation in your eye
Your doctor can order HLAs antigen tests, including tests for HLA-B27, when you’re undergoing a kidney or bone marrow transplant. These tests can be used to ensure a suitable match between you and a donor.